From Fulton to Constellation: The Worst Accidents in the History of the Brooklyn Navy Yard

Filed to: Brooklyn Navy Yard

Workers being rescued. Michael DeLucia Collection, Brooklyn Navy Yard Archive.

Today marks the 57th anniversary of perhaps the darkest day in the history of the Brooklyn Navy Yard. To commemorate the fire on board the USS Constellation, we are going to look back at some of the most notable and deadliest accidents in the history of the Yard.

Shipbuilding is a dangerous business (even today), and fatal accidents were frequent throughout industry in the nineteenth century. The scale, pace, and nature of the work in the Navy Yard made it particularly risky, as workers and sailors fell victim to hazards like falling from great heights, being struck by heavy loads, violent machinery, drowning, fires, and exploding munitions and equipment. Workplace safety began to improve around the time of World War I, and more concerted campaigns began during World War II, when safety was urged as an imperative of national security. (more…)


Brooklyn Navy Yard Fall Photo Contest

Filed to: Brooklyn Navy YardPhotography

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For our penultimate Brooklyn Navy Yard Seasonal Photography Tour of 2017, we asked another Yard-based artist to make selections for the year-end finalists. Nick Golebiewski is a visual artist who makes large-scale gouache paintings – a type of opaque watercolor – of New York cityscapes. His “Nick’s Lunchbox Service” is daily drawing series in which he draws the landscape in front on him, and is definitely worth checking out on his Instagram feed. The series is in its fourth year and has been featured as a Twitter Moment, in collaborations online with the Jewish Museum, the Museum at Eldridge Street, and Dyckman Farmhouse Museum, and through the “Walk & Draw” tours he’s led with the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation. (more…)


Hopkins Views from the Hill: Hopkins’ Network at Work

Filed to: Brooklyn Navy YardFood Cart ToursPress

Hopkins Views

Hopkins Views from the Hill, Fall 2017

by Judy Sirota Rosenthal and Leo Sorrel

In July 2017, Andrew Gustafson hosted a student from his high school alma mater, New Haven’s Hopkins School, as part of the school’s Job Shadow Program. Senior Andrew Roberge joined us checking in with our street vendor partners in Midtown, working in our office in the Brooklyn Navy Yard, and attending a professional development training at Green-Wood Cemetery.

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Explore the World of Street Vending at Museum at Eldridge Street, Nov 29

Filed to: EventsStreet Vending

A woman wearing glasses in an apron and a young man next to her are both standing in front of a metal food cart on a busy street.

Join us on Nov. 29 at the Museum at Eldridge Street when Cindy VandenBosch will be moderating a conversation about street vending, past and present, covering the industry’s deep roots on the Lower East Side, hearing from some of today’s most popular sidewalk chefs, and learning about the the many other players that support this industry. Panelists will include Adam Sobel of the Vendy Awards-winning kosher vegan food truck The Cinnamon Snail, Jack Beller of multigenerational food cart fabricator Worksman Cycles-800BuyCart, Lower Manhattan street vendor Veronica Julien of Veronica’s Kitchen, and attorney and advocate Matt Shapiro of the Street Vendor Project.

Wednesday, Nov. 29, 7pm | Museum at Eldridge Street | >> More Information <<


Chicago Tribune: Borough with a view: Brooklyn beckons with new hotels, other perks

Filed to: Brooklyn Navy YardPress

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Chicago Tribune, November 6, 2017

by Elaine Glusac

The Brooklyn Navy Yard, an expansive, 300-acre patch of waterfront established in 1801 and the birthplace of the USS Maine, now serves as an incubator for startups. We visited the center of green entrepreneurship, hosting everything from a film studio to an eco-manufacturing center and artist studios, on Turnstile Tours’ two-hour trip around the docks ($30) that drew both history buffs and hipsters.

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Archtober Podcast: Brooklyn Grange Farm at the Brooklyn Navy Yard

Filed to: ArchitectureBrooklyn Navy YardPressWorld War I

Staff at Brooklyn Grange watering

Throughout AIA NY’s Archtober – New York Architecture Month – each day has a “Building of the Day,” which is highlighted with tours and other programming. This year, three of the 29 featured sites are located in the Brooklyn Navy Yard, including New Lab, the Naval Cemetery Landscape, and on October 3, the Brooklyn Grange Rooftop Farm. As part of the celebration, our own Andrew Gustafson sat down with Grange COO Gwen Schantz to talk about the farm and the history of the building it sits on, the massive Building 3.

In this 5-minute conversation, they discussed the construction of Building 3 during the height of World War I, past and current uses of the building, and how and why the Grange built their 1.5-acre farm on this 11-story structure. The podcast is featured on Culture Now’s Museum Without Walls project. (more…)


Brooklyn Navy Yard Summer Photography Contest Judge: Painter Jeff Britton

Filed to: Brooklyn Navy YardPhotography

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On our Brooklyn Navy Yard Photography Tours, we’re always encouraging people to look for the unexpected. Even on streets we’ve walked down a thousand times, there may be something new, or something very old you never noticed before.

Walking down the halls of the enormous Building 3, constructed in 1917 and one of the Yard’s largest buildings, I recently found something very unexpected. I walked into Triple J Bedding, a distributor of linens to hotels and hospitals across the country; stacks of sheets, blankets, and towels were stacked floor to ceiling with just narrow passages between them. After wending my way through this cavern, I found a little oasis at the back – the studio of artist Jeff Britton. (more…)


The Bridge: The Brooklyn Tour Guides Who Know All the Secrets

Filed to: Brooklyn Army TerminalBrooklyn Navy YardPressProspect ParkPublic Markets

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The Bridge, July 12, 2017

by Emily Nonko

As Brooklyn’s tourism industry heats up, double-decker buses have crossed the river in herds, whirling visitors around Grand Army Plaza and other dramatic sights. But to paraphrase the song from Hamilton, what’d they miss? Lots, according to Brooklyn-based Turnstile Tours, which has made a name for itself with a completely different approach: depth. On a Turnstile Tour of the cavernous Brooklyn Army Terminal, for example, you’ll find out that the massive base was once used as a storage warehouse for alcohol seized during Prohibition. Millions of gallons of booze were dumped into the harbor!

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French Morning: Vignoble-rooftop, distillerie, entrepôts: visitez le Brooklyn Navy Yard

Filed to: Brooklyn Navy YardPress

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French Morning, July 5, 2017

by Nadège Fougeras

Pour cette expérience, vous allez devoir être organisés. Car vous devrez vous inscrire à une visite.

Le Brooklyn Navy Yard, vous le voyez sur toutes les cartes, mais y êtes-vous déjà allés ? C’est cette friche industrielle immense au nord du pont de Manhattan, dans laquelle ont été construits les plus grands bateaux de la marine américaine. Un lieu hautement chargé d’histoire.

Il y a encore six mois, on pouvait s’y balader en loucedé, sans trop se faire prendre. Aujourd’hui, on dirait Fort Knox. Tout cet espace est en effet en train d’être complètement réhabilité et transformé pour accueillir des entreprises, des artistes, un musée… C’est incroyable et impressionnant. Ici, le but, c’est de créer des emplois, plus que de faire de l’argent. Les loyers sont faibles, et devraient le rester. (Bon, ça, on verra. On est à NY, ne l’oublions pas;-)

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