Immigrants Who Made the Brooklyn Navy Yard Great: James Diani

Filed to: Brooklyn Navy Yard

"Old Jim" Diani's obituary in the Brooklyn Daily Eagle, September 4, 1908

This post is part of our eight-part series profiling immigrants to the United States who made significant contributions to the Brooklyn Navy Yard from the eighteenth century to the present day.


James Diani (c.1833–1908)

So far in this series, we have profiled commodores, admirals, and captains of industry. But the real history of the Brooklyn Navy Yard is the massive collective labor of thousands of individuals coming together to accomplish extraordinary things. The Navy Yard provided opportunities for newcomers to this country to get decent-paying jobs and apprenticeships (if you could successfully navigate the patronage system) to better their lives. One such person, who spent more than 50 years in the service of this country, was someone we know very little about. (more…)


Immigrants Who Made the Brooklyn Navy Yard Great: Peter Asserson

Filed to: Brooklyn Navy YardWorld War I

Adm. Peter C. Asserson, printed in "A History of Long Island, Vol. III" (1902)

This post is part of our eight-part series profiling immigrants to the United States who made significant contributions to the Brooklyn Navy Yard from the eighteenth century to the present day.


Peter Christian Asserson (1839–1906)

The Brooklyn Navy Yard has always adapted to change. Over its first 165 years, rapid changes in naval ship designs forced the adoption of new shipbuilding technologies, materials, and techniques, and the construction of new facilities. No single person did more to shepherd the Yard through these transitions than Peter Christian Asserson, civil engineer of the Navy Yard from 1885 to 1901. (more…)


Immigrants Who Made the Brooklyn Navy Yard Great: John Ericsson

Filed to: Brooklyn Navy Yard

Portrait of John Ericsson by Avid Nyholm

This post is part of our eight-part series profiling immigrants to the United States who made significant contributions to the Brooklyn Navy Yard from the eighteenth century to the present day.


John Ericsson (1803–1889)

John Ericsson was perhaps more of an engineer than any man who ever lived. Of his 85 years on this earth, 75 of them were spent as an engineer, and he worked in almost every conceivable field of engineering a person could in the 19th century, spanning the apogee of the Industrial Revolution.  (more…)


Immigrants Who Made the Brooklyn Navy Yard Great: Henry Eckford

Filed to: Brooklyn Navy Yard

00f48a6b-ba8c-4bf9-b484-b1b5d2e3abe3-1851-00000210cd46539b_tmp.jpg

This post is part of our eight-part series profiling immigrants to the United States who made significant contributions to the Brooklyn Navy Yard from the eighteenth century to the present day.


Henry Eckford (1775-1832)

The long, arduous, and risky journey to America has a way of bringing to our shores the most ambitious, talented, and daring people; Henry Eckford was certainly one of those. Born and raised in the Scottish town of Kilwinning, located not far from the famous shipbuilding center along the Firth of Clyde, Eckford set off from his homeland for Canada to learn the shipbuilding trade at just 16. Like John Barry, he apprenticed with his uncle, and became a skilled shipwright in the yards along the St. Lawrence River. (more…)


Immigrants Who Made the Brooklyn Navy Yard Great: John Barry

Filed to: Brooklyn Navy Yard

554d4685-c311-440e-9c50-5b53461c722b-917-000000b20a9a76d8_tmp-1.jpg

This post is part of our eight-part series profiling immigrants to the United States who made significant contributions to the Brooklyn Navy Yard from the eighteenth century to the present day.


John Barry (1745–1803)

Born in Ireland’s southeast County Wexford, John Barry grew up with an abiding hatred for the English. When he was 12, his Catholic family was dispossessed of their land by an English landlord, forcing them to live with family nearby and beginning a period of immense hardship for the family. Barry began apprenticing on his uncle’s fishing vessel, learning the trade of the sea, and at 15 he left Ireland for the Americas, eventually settling in Philadelphia. His career was remarkably successful, as he became master (captain) of a small merchant vessel at just 21 and was the trusted master for one of Philadelphia’s most prominent shipowners, John Nixon. When war broke out and the Continental Navy was formed, Barry became the first commissioned captain to command an American naval vessel, taking on the 14-gun USS Lexington on December 17, 1775. (more…)


The Lo-Down: Essex Street Market Debuts Historical Mural

Filed to: PressPublic Markets

TLD_TWITTER_01_400x400

The Lo-Down, January 30, 2017

by Ed Litvak

If you visited the Essex Street Market this past weekend, you probably noticed this new historical mural celebrating the legacy of the 77-year-old public facility.

The 20-foot display presents a timeline from 1900 through the opening of the market by Mayor Fiorello La Guardia in 1940, up to the present day. It was a collaboration among the Lower East Side Partnership, the Essex Street Market Vendor Association and Turnstile Tours, which provided research for the project. It was made possible through a grant from Avenue NYC, a program of the NYC Department of Small Business Services. The mural was installed in partnership with the Economic Development Corp., which operates the market.

>> Read More


Market Value: How Public Markets Drive the Baking Industry Forward

Filed to: EventsInside IndustryPresentationsPublic MarketsTurnstile Studio

several roles being sprinkled with powder

An Essex Street Market “Talk & Taste” event about the baking industry in New York City

Baking is literally our bread and butter in New York City making up the majority of food manufacturing businesses within the five boroughs. On December 8th, 2016 at the Essex Street Market, members of the public joined us for a taste of bagels and fresh bread and a behind-the-scenes look at the baking industry. Guest speakers included Lee Wellington, Executive Director of the Urban Manufacturing Alliance, Gene Davidovich, CEO of Davidovich Bakery, Uliks Fehmiu, Co-Founder & President of Pain D’Avignon, and the general manager from the new bread-themed Eataly NYC Downtown location. Moderator Cindy VandenBosch of Turnstile Tours interviewed panelists about what it takes to operate a food production and distribution business in New York City and the unique role public markets – like Essex Street Market – play in supporting the baking industry. This event was organized by Cindy VandenBosch and Lauren Margolis of the Essex Street Market Vendors Association.

If you missed the event, you can watch the whole discussion on below or on our Facebook page.

(more…)


Vote in the 2016 Brooklyn Navy Yard Photo Contest

Filed to: Brooklyn Navy YardPhotography

2016-bny-photo-finalists

This is year four of our photography tours of the Brooklyn Navy Yard, and we need your help to select the best photo of the Yard of 2016. All of these photos were taken across four two-hour explorations we led in partnership with the Brooklyn Navy Yard Center at BLDG 92. We received 118 submissions from 22 different visitors for our photography contest, and four judges – one a former staffer at the Yard, one a BLDG 92 Visiting artist, and two artists with studios in the Yard – volunteered their time to select the 12 you see below. (more…)


Fall 2016: Brooklyn Navy Yard Photo Contest

Filed to: Brooklyn Navy YardEventsPhotography

img_2190-2

Last week we held our final Brooklyn Navy Yard Seasonal Photography Tour of 2016 (don’t worry if you missed it – our next one will be on January 22). Stay tuned because after we receive the last three finalist photos from this round, we’ll be unveiling the online voting for the year-end People’s Choice Award, and these finalists will be put on display in the Brooklyn Navy Yard Center at BLDG 92.

On this Election Day, our photography judge gets to make a much more pleasant and interesting selection than most of us casting our ballots at polling places. This season’s judge is Thyra Heder, an artist, author, illustrator, and woman of many talents who has called the Yard home for many years. If you’re a fan of children’s books, you may have seen her wonderful debut Fraidyzoo (on sale in the BLDG 92 gift shop), which she followed up with The Bear Report. (more…)


Guide to Open House New York 2016

Filed to: ArchitectureBrooklyn Army TerminalBrooklyn Navy YardEvents

The inside of a metal fabrication shop, a fork lift drives down the center of the space

Open House New York Weekend is always one of our favorite times of year, when hundreds of sites open their doors to the public on October 15 and 16. We don’t get to see as much as we’d like, however, as we’re almost always working – many of our partner sites are also very active participants in OHNY. This year, both the Brooklyn Navy Yard and Brooklyn Army Terminal will be open, with more to see than ever before. Here’s a quick guide to visiting during OHNY. (more…)