Turnstile Tours offers interactive and educational tours in partnership with non-profit organizations on topics ranging from the the history of New York City’s industrial waterfront to the contemporary stories of the city’s manufacturers, immigrant entrepreneurs, urban planners, and architects. Below you will find information on all of our programs for your people, including detailed information on educational standards that these programs fulfill. Turnstile Tours guarantees that all educational tours will engage youth participants to:

  • actively participate in the process of interpreting primary and secondary sources relevant to the tour experience
  • share personal connections, prior knowledge, and opinions
  • make observations, share opinions and perspectives, and draw conclusions based on larger issues related to the tours

All our staff members have experience teaching in either classroom or museum settings for K-12 students or at the college level, and more than half have expertise in working with young people who have intellectual, learning, and physical disabilities. Staff members are assigned to educational groups based on their relevant teaching experience and expertise and background in the subject matter. To learn more about our team, please click here.

The section below is for school and youth groups. If you are interested in more specialized tours, click below to find more detailed information for:

Academic & Professional Groups • Private Groups & Individuals • Travel & Tourism Industry

• Click the tiles below for information on our tour programs •

BNYThe background includes a large atrium with railroad tracks running down the middle with large concrete walls with balconies on both sides of the atrium with a foreground that reads Brooklyn Army Terminal in white lettering.A metal food cart in the background with text that reads Food Cart Tours in white lettering in the foreground.Background includes a market that reads "Moore Street Market" with the words Immigrant Foodways in the foreground in white lettering


BROOKLYN NAVY YARD TOURS

Aerial perspective of the Brooklyn Navy Yard with industrial buildings and dry docks along Wallabout Bay. Manhattan is in the background.School programs at the Brooklyn Navy Yard are offered by the Brooklyn Historical Society in partnership with the Brooklyn Navy Yard Center at BLDG 92, and these tours are offered free of charge to New York City public schools. If you are interested in these programs, please click below:

>> Info on Brooklyn Historical Society Programs at the Brooklyn Navy Yard <<

If no Brooklyn Historical Society programs are available, or if these programs do not fit your specific needs, please read below for more information on our programs.

Turnstile Tours offers group tour packages and customized itineraries on behalf of the Brooklyn Navy Yard Center at BLDG 92 that range in theme from World War II and maritime history to sustainable architecture and 21st-century manufacturing practices. The 1-hour, 1.5-hour, and 2-hour tours highlighted below explore the 300-acre (126-hectare) historic Yard that is today a city-owned industrial park home to more than 330 businesses. Any of these tour programs can be adapted based on your interests and goals for one visit or multiple visits. Packages are also available and can include guided or self-guided explorations of the exhibits at BLDG 92, pre-ordered lunches, and customized half-day or full-day itineraries of Brooklyn (contact us for a proposal and pricing information).

Tour Programs:

A man holds up an image as he sits in front of an industrial crane and people smile as they look on⚓ Past, Present & Future Tour

For over 150 years, the Brooklyn Navy Yard churned out America’s most famous fighting Naval ships, from the USS Maine to the USS Missouri. Today, the Yard is a model for sustainable urban industrial parks and is home to over 330 industrial and creative businesses. This guided tour explores the vast 300-acre (126-hectare) property along Brooklyn’s industrial waterfront and offers opportunities to take a closer look at the Yard’s most intriguing sites, including a dry dock that’s been used for ship repair since 1851, historic buildings that are being adaptively reused for industrial purposes, and the Green Manufacturing Center, a future hub for the development of new products and technologies. Oral history clips and historical photographs from the site’s Naval past, as well as stories of industrial innovators at the Yard today, will also be included on this tour. While we’ll use a bus to get you from place to place, we will be getting off the bus at several locations throughout the Yard to take a closer look.

tugboat_Family

🔎 Yard Inspectors

Ideal for groups K-5th grade, this 1-hour, hands-on exploration acquaints students with this working waterfront. Following clues to navigate the yard, students find FDNY fireboats, see a dry dock and simulate how it’s used to repair ships, and earn badges at the end as “certified” Yard Inspectors.

 

 

Wind turbines on top of an aluminum building

🏢 Sustainable Architecture & Industry Tour

Once America’s premier Naval shipyard, today the Brooklyn Navy Yard is a mission-driven industrial park and a hub of industry, technology, and craft. Explore the Navy Yard’s unique architecture and examine the many layers of history visible in the landscape, from Civil War-era machine shops to innovative LEED-Certified structures, and see how these buildings have been adapted for modern manufacturing. Learn about development projects currently underway at the Yard, which are projected to more than double the Yard’s workforce to over 16,000 by 2020, the greatest expansion of the Yard since World War II.

This tour showcases the role the Brooklyn Navy Yard plays in providing economic opportunities for thousands of New Yorkers, from small business owners to manufacturing workers to technology startups, and looks at the infrastructure that keeps the Yard – and all of New York City – running, including stormwater management, solid waste, and alternative energy systems. The tour covers most of the massive 300-acre campus, including visits to the still-active 1851 Dry Dock No. 1, the one-million-square-foot World War II-era Building 77, the sites of the Admiral’s Row and Dock 72 projects, and the LEED Platinum-certified Brooklyn Navy Yard Center at BLDG 92.

USS Menges and USS Holder being repaired in dry dock 5 or 6, 1944🚢 World War II Tour

The Brooklyn Navy Yard played a pivotal role in World War II, building battleships and aircraft carriers, repairing over 5,000 ships, and sending troops and supplies to fronts across the globe. Not only did the Yard construct the USS Arizona a generation before the war, which was sunk at Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, but it is also where the battleship Missouri was constructed, where the peace treaty ending the war was signed in 1945. Thanks to the efforts of its 70,000 workers, the Brooklyn Navy Yard became the world’s busiest shipyard, earning the nickname “The Can-Do Yard” for its ability to patch up wounded ships and put them back in action.

This tour examines the role of the New York City waterfront in the war effort, explores connections between the Yard and famous battles of World War II, and visits sites of significance that remain from this era, including the former ship assembly shops and the historic Dry Dock 1. Throughout the tour, we listen to clips of oral histories recorded with sailors and shipworkers who were at the Yard during the war, including from women working in industrial jobs, and from people of color, for whom the war presented both challenges and new opportunities. This tour aims to evoke a sense of what the Yard was like during the war – a place of tremendous energy, innovation, and achievement, but tempered by terrible loss. While we use a bus to get you from place to place, we provide opportunities for everyone to get off the bus at several stops for a closer look at historically significant sites.

🌻 Urban Ecology Tour

Discover the natural world in the midst a thriving urban industrial park on this 2-hour tour of the Brooklyn Navy Yard, where we will explore New York City’s waterways, terrestrial ecosystems and urban farms. The highlight of the tour is the stunning 65,000-square-foot Brooklyn Grange rooftop farm, where we will learn how they produce thousands of pounds of vegetables annually – as well as honey and eggs – and are a national leader in the development of rooftop and urban farming techniques. From the rooftop, we’ll also have amazing views of the Yard, including an extensive green rooftop and one of the largest rooftop solar installations in New York City.

Descending to the bank of the East River, we will visit an oyster restoration project led by students from the New York Harbor School and will discuss the improving health of the city’s waterways, and the challenges that remain. We will also explore planned and unplanned natural landscapes of the Yard, including the landscape architecture surrounding BLDG 92, identifying native and exotic plant species along the way. Finally, we will visit New York City’s newest green space, the Brooklyn Greenway Initiative‘s Naval Cemetery Landscape, a meadow designed to restore the natural habitat, provide a space for environmental education, and commemorate the thousands of sailors, Marines, and others once interred at the site.

This tour will reveal that the natural world truly is all around us, even in the heart of the city.

A museum exhibit that includes a series of photographs and videos to the right and an exhibit case with commercial products to the left

⚓ Explore the Exhibits at the Brooklyn Navy Yard Center at BLDG 92

BLDG 92 offers three floors of exhibits about the past, present, and future of the Yard. The galleries are open to the public Wednesday-Sunday, 12-6pm, and admission is always free. If you would like to incorporate a 1-hour guided tour of the exhibits into your visit to the Brooklyn Navy Yard, that can be arranged, subject to availability.

Brooklyn Navy Yard Tours are available for 1 hour, 1.5 hours, or 2 hours.

The tours are designed to be 2 hours in length, so only the full 2-hour tour will include all the sites and themes listed in the description. We are happy to discuss any modification to the tour in order to accommodate your desired itinerary.

All rates below include a knowledgeable and engaging guide from Turnstile Tours and a map of the site. Bus tours include a 32-passenger bus and driver provided by the Brooklyn Navy Yard Development Corporation, and bicycle tours include a bicycle safety sweep in addition to the tour guide.

All tours require a minimum of 15 participants or equivalent payment.

2-hour Tour (by bus or bicycle):

  • Standard Rate: $30 per person
  • Non-profit & Educational Rate: $27 per person

1.5-hour Tour (by bus or bicycle): 

  • Standard Rate: $24 per person
  • Non-profit & Educational Rate: $21.60 per person

1-hour Tour (by bus or bicycle): 

  • Standard Rate: $18 per person
  • Non-profit & Educational Rate: $16 per person

1-Hour BLDG 92 Exhibit Tour at BLDG 92: Rates below include a knowledgeable and engaging guide from the Brooklyn Navy Yard Center at BLDG 92 and an exhibit pamphlet.

  • Standard Rate for all groups: $5 per person (minimum of 10 people)

Customized Itineraries and Tour Packages: Please contact us for customized requests and quotes.

Groups that provide their own bus transportation will receive a discount. Private buses must provide proof of commercial vehicle insurance in order to enter the Brooklyn Navy Yard.

The Brooklyn Navy Yard covers 300 acres, so transportation by bus or bicycle is required to get around the site safely and efficiently. The Yard is a secure industrial park, and their is no public access except for Yard tenants, their guests, and tour participants accompanied by a guide.

Tours using BNYDC Bus:

All tours can be offered year-round using the Brooklyn Navy Yard Development Corporation’s 32-passenger bus for private group tours. The BNYDC bus is generally available during the following times (subject to availability):

  • Saturday-Sunday 10:30am-1pm
  • Monday-Tuesday 10:30am-3:30pm
  • Wednesday-Friday 2:30-3:30pm
  • These times apply during the academic year; more dates are available during summer months

Tours using Private Buses:

For groups of 33 or more people, or if the BNYDC bus is unavailable, Turnstile Tours can charter private buses seven days per week, subject to availability, but please note that pricing will differ based on charter rental fees. Groups may also provide their own bus transportation and will receive a discount on group rates. Private buses must provide proof of commercial vehicle insurance in order to enter the Brooklyn Navy Yard and be accompanied by a tour guide.

Tours by bicycle: 

All tours can be offered by bicycle only on Saturdays and Sundays during daylight hours. Groups must provide their own bicycles, and everyone must wear safety helmets in order to participate. Upon request, Turnstile Tours can arrange for bicycle rentals and safety gear with partner bicycle rental companies.

Private tours require a minimum of 15 participants, or equivalent payment. Tours that utilize the Brooklyn Navy Yard bus are restricted to 32 participants. We can accommodate larger groups, including coach buses.

All tours listed support educators’ efforts to achieve standards outlined by the Common Core in English language arts and literacy, including grade-appropriate skills and understandings in alignment with Grades 6-12 Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects and with College and Career Readiness Standards for Speaking and Listening in both Comprehension and Collaboration and Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas.

While the Common Core has been adopted by over 40 states, social studies and science learning standards are still currently determined state by state; therefore, Turnstile Tours has used the New York State’s Social Studies Framework and New York State’s Science Learning Standards and Core Curriculum as a point of reference regarding content. Please click the tabs for specific information regarding content.

This tour supports the following Key Ideas and Conceptual Understandings of the New York State Framework for Social Studies:

UNIFYING SOCIAL STUDIES THEMES FOR K-12:

  • Time, Continuity, and Change
  • Geography, Humans, and the Environment
  • Power, Authority, and Governance
  • Civic Ideals and Practices
  • Creation, Expansion, and Interaction of Economic Systems
  • Science, Technology, and Innovation
  • Global Connections and Exchange

GRADE 4: NEW YORK STATE AND LOCAL HISTORY AND GOVERNMENT

4.3 COLONIAL AND REVOLUTIONARY PERIOD IN NEW YORK: European exploration led to the colonization of the region that became New York State. Beginning in the early 1600s, colonial New York was home to people from many different countries. Colonial New York was important during the Revolutionary Period.

4.3d Growing conflicts between England and the 13 colonies over issues of political and economic rights led to the American Revolution. New York played a significant role during the Revolution, in part due to its geographic location.

4.6 WESTWARD MOVEMENT AND INDUSTRIALIZATION: New York State played an important role in the growth of the United States. During the 1800s, people traveled west looking for opportunities. Economic activities in New York State are varied and have changed over time, with improvements in transportation and technology.

4.6c Improved technology such, as the steam engine and the telegraph made transportation and communication faster and easier. Later developments in transportation and communication technology had an effect on communities, the State, and the world.

4.6f Between 1865 and 1915, rapid industrialization occurred in New York State. Over time, industries and manufacturing continued to grow.

4.6g As manufacturing moved out of New York State, service industries and high-technology industries have grown.

4.7 IMMIGRATION AND MIGRATION FROM THE EARLY 1800S TO THE PRESENT: Many people have immigrated and migrated to New York State contributing to its cultural growth and development.

4.7a Immigrants came to New York State for a variety of reasons. Many immigrants arriving in New York City were greeted by the sight of the Statue of Liberty and were processed through Ellis Island.

GRADE 8: HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES AND NEW YORK STATE II

8.2 A CHANGING SOCIETY: Industrialization and immigration contributed to the urbanization of America. Problems resulting from these changes sparked the Progressive movement and increased calls for reform.

8.2a Technological developments changed the modes of production, and access to natural resources facilitated increased industrialization. The demand for labor in urban industrial areas resulted in increased migration from rural areas and a rapid increase in immigration to the United States. New York City became the nation’s largest city, and other cities in New York State also experienced growth at this time.

8.2b Population density, diversity, technologies, and industry in urban areas shaped the social, cultural, and economic lives of people.

8.6 WORLD WAR II: The aggression of the Axis powers threatened United States security and led to its entry into World War II. The nature and consequences of warfare during World War II transformed the United States and the global community. The damage from total warfare and atrocities such as the Holocaust led to a call for international efforts to protect human rights and prevent future wars.

8.6a Worldwide economic depression, militant nationalism, the rise of totalitarian rule, and the unsuccessful efforts of the League of Nations to preserve peace contributed to the outbreak of war in Europe and Asia.

8.6b From 1939 to 1941, the United States government tried to maintain neutrality while providing aid to Britain but was drawn into the war by the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. The United States fought a war on multiple fronts. At home, the economy was converted to war production, and essential resources were rationed to ensure adequate supplies for military use.

8.7 FOREIGN POLICY: The period after World War II has been characterized by an ideological and political struggle, first between the United States and communism during the Cold War, then between the United States and forces of instability in the Middle East. Increased economic interdependence and competition, as well as environmental concerns, are challenges faced by the United States.

8.7e Increased globalization has led to increased economic interdependence and competition.

8.8 DEMOGRAPHIC CHANGE: After World War II, the population of the United States rose sharply as a result of both natural increases and immigration. Population movements have resulted in changes to the American landscape and shifting political power. An aging population is affecting the economy and straining public resources.

8.8a After World War II, the United States experienced various shifts in population and demographics that resulted in social, political, and economic consequences.

GRADE 10: GLOBAL HISTORY AND GEOGRAPHY II 1914-Present 10.9 GLOBALIZATION AND A CHANGING GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT (1990–PRESENT): Technological changes have resulted in a more interconnected world, affecting economic and political relations and in some cases leading to conflict and in others to efforts to cooperate. Globalization and population pressures have led to strains on the environment.

10.9a Technological changes in communication and transportation systems allow for instantaneous interconnections and new networks of exchange between people and places that have lessened the effects of time and distance.

10.9c Population pressures, industrialization, and urbanization have increased demands for limited natural resources and food resources, often straining the environment.

GRADE 11: UNITED STATES HISTORY AND GOVERNMENT 11.5 INDUSTRIALIZATION AND URBANIZATION (1870 – 1920): The United States was transformed from an agrarian to an increasingly industrial and urbanized society. Although this transformation created new economic opportunities, it also created societal problems that were addressed by a variety of reform efforts.

11.5a New technologies and economic models created rapid industrial growth and transformed the United States.

11.5b Rapid industrialization and urbanization created significant challenges and societal problems that were addressed by a variety of reform efforts.

11.8. WORLD WAR II (1935 – 1945): The participation of the United States in World War II was a transformative event for the nation and its role in the world.

11.8b United States entry into World War II had a significant impact on American society.

11.11 THE UNITED STATES IN A GLOBALIZING WORLD (1990 – present) The United States’ political and economic status in the world has faced external and internal challenges related to international conflicts, economic competition, and globalization. Throughout this time period, the nation has continued to debate and define its role in the world.

11.11c Globalization and advances in technology have affected the United States economy and society.

GRADE 12: PARTICIPATION IN GOVERNMENT AND CIVICS

12.E3 THE IMPACT OF AMERICAN CAPITALISM IN A GLOBAL ECONOMY: There are various economic systems in the world. The United States operates within a mixed, free market economy that is characterized by competition and a limited role of government in economic affairs. Economic policy makers face considerable challenges within a capitalist system, including unemployment, inflation, poverty, and environmental consequences. Globalization increases the complexity of these challenges significantly, and has exerted strong and transformative effects on workers and entrepreneurs in the United States economy.

12.E3a As the United States has evolved from an agrarian to an industrial to an information economy, the workplace requires a more highly skilled and educated workforce.

12.E3b The government’s evolving role in protecting property rights, regulating working conditions, protecting the right to bargain collectively, and reducing discrimination in the workplace has attempted to balance the power between workers and employers. This role shifts in response to government’s need to stimulate the economy balanced against the need to curb abusive business practices.

12.E3c The freedom of the United States economy encourages entrepreneurialism. This is an important factor behind economic growth that can lead to intended consequences (e.g., growth, competition, innovation, improved standard of living, productivity, specialization, trade, outsourcing, class mobility, positive externalities) and unintended consequences (e.g., recession, depression, trade, unemployment, outsourcing, generational poverty, income inequality, the challenges of class mobility, negative externalities.).

12.E3d A degree of regulation, oversight, or government control is necessary in some markets to ensure free and fair competition and to limit unintended consequences of American capitalism. Government attempts to protect the worker, ensure property rights, and to regulate the marketplace, as well as to promote income equality and social mobility, have had varied results.

12.G5 PUBLIC POLICY: All levels of government—local, state, and federal—are involved in shaping public policy and responding to public policy issues, all of which influence our lives beyond what appears in the Constitution. Engaged citizens understand how to find, monitor, evaluate, and respond to information on public policy issues.

12.G5c Successful implementation of government policy often requires cooperation between many levels of government, as well as the cooperation of other public and private institutions. Conflicts between different levels of government sometimes emerge due to different goals, ideas, and resources regarding the creation and implementation of policy.

12.E4 THE TOOLS OF ECONOMIC POLICY IN A GLOBAL ECONOMY: Globalization and increased economic interdependence affect the United States economy significantly. The tools that the policy makers have available to address these issues are fiscal policy, monetary policy, and trade policy.

12.E4b The president and Congress determine fiscal policy by establishing the level of spending and taxing in the annual budget. Some tax programs are designed to provide incentives to individuals and businesses that influence private sector spending, saving, and investment.

This tour supports the following standards for Math, Science, and Technology (MST) in New York State and Key Ideas and Conceptual Understandings of the New York State Framework for Social Studies:

MATH, SCIENCE, AND TECHNOLOGY STANDARDS:

STANDARD 1: Students will use mathematical analysis, scientific inquiry, and engineering design, as appropriate, to pose questions, seek answers, and develop solutions.

  • Key Idea: Engineering design is an iterative process involving modeling and optimization (finding the best solution within given constraints) which is used to develop technological solutions to problems within given constraints.

STANDARD 4: Students will understand and apply scientific concepts, principles, and theories pertaining to the physical setting and living environment and recognize the historical development of ideas in science.

Physical Setting:

  • Key Idea 2: Many of the phenomena that we observe on Earth involve interactions among components of air, water, and land.
  • Key Idea 4: Energy exists in many forms, and when these forms change energy is conserved.

Living Environment:

  • Key Idea 1: Living things are both similar to and different from each other and from nonliving things.
  • Key Idea 6: Plants and animals depend on each other and their physical environment.
  • Key Idea 7: Human decisions and activities have had a profound impact on the physical and living environment.

STANDARD 6: Interconnectedness: Common Themes – Students will understand the relationships and common themes that connect mathematics, science, and technology and apply the themes to these and other areas of learning.

UNIFYING SOCIAL STUDIES THEMES FOR K-12:

  • Time, Continuity, and Change
  • Geography, Humans, and the Environment
  • Power, Authority, and Governance
  • Civic Ideals and Practices
  • Creation, Expansion, and Interaction of Economic Systems
  • Science, Technology, and Innovation
  • Global Connections and Exchange

GRADE 8: HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES AND NEW YORK STATE II

8.7 FOREIGN POLICY: The period after World War II has been characterized by an ideological and political struggle, first between the United States and communism during the Cold War, then between the United States and forces of instability in the Middle East. Increased economic interdependence and competition, as well as environmental concerns, are challenges faced by the United States.

8.7e Increased globalization has led to increased economic interdependence and competition.

8.8 DEMOGRAPHIC CHANGE: After World War II, the population of the United States rose sharply as a result of both natural increases and immigration. Population movements have resulted in changes to the American landscape and shifting political power. An aging population is affecting the economy and straining public resources.

8.8a After World War II, the United States experienced various shifts in population and demographics that resulted in social, political, and economic consequences.

8.8c Pollution, population growth, the consumption of natural resources, clearing of land for human sustenance, and large-scale industrialization have put added stress on the global environment.

GRADE 10: GLOBAL HISTORY AND GEOGRAPHY II Contemporary Issues:

10.9 GLOBALIZATION AND A CHANGING GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT (1990–PRESENT): Technological changes have resulted in a more interconnected world, affecting economic and political relations and in some cases leading to conflict and in others to efforts to cooperate. Globalization and population pressures have led to strains on the environment.

10.9a Technological changes in communication and transportation systems allow for instantaneous interconnections and new networks of exchange between people and places that have lessened the effects of time and distance.

10.9c Population pressures, industrialization, and urbanization have increased demands for limited natural resources and food resources, often straining the environment.

GRADE 11: UNITED STATES HISTORY AND GOVERNMENT

11.8. WORLD WAR II (1935 – 1945): The participation of the United States in World War II was a transformative event for the nation and its role in the world.

11.8b United States entry into World War II had a significant impact on American society.

11.11 THE UNITED STATES IN A GLOBALIZING WORLD (1990 – present) The United States’ political and economic status in the world has faced external and internal challenges related to international conflicts, economic competition, and globalization. Throughout this time period, the nation has continued to debate and define its role in the world.

11.11c Globalization and advances in technology have affected the United States economy and society.

GRADE 12: PARTICIPATION IN GOVERNMENT AND CIVICS

12.E3 THE IMPACT OF AMERICAN CAPITALISM IN A GLOBAL ECONOMY: There are various economic systems in the world. The United States operates within a mixed, free market economy that is characterized by competition and a limited role of government in economic affairs. Economic policy makers face considerable challenges within a capitalist system, including unemployment, inflation, poverty, and environmental consequences. Globalization increases the complexity of these challenges significantly, and has exerted strong and transformative effects on workers and entrepreneurs in the United States economy.

12.E3a As the United States has evolved from an agrarian to an industrial to an information economy, the workplace requires a more highly skilled and educated workforce.

12.E3b The government’s evolving role in protecting property rights, regulating working conditions, protecting the right to bargain collectively, and reducing discrimination in the workplace has attempted to balance the power between workers and employers. This role shifts in response to government’s need to stimulate the economy balanced against the need to curb abusive business practices.

12.E3c The freedom of the United States economy encourages entrepreneurialism. This is an important factor behind economic growth that can lead to intended consequences (e.g., growth, competition, innovation, improved standard of living, productivity, specialization, trade, outsourcing, class mobility, positive externalities) and unintended consequences (e.g., recession, depression, trade, unemployment, outsourcing, generational poverty, income inequality, the challenges of class mobility, negative externalities.).

12.E3d A degree of regulation, oversight, or government control is necessary in some markets to ensure free and fair competition and to limit unintended consequences of American capitalism. Government attempts to protect the worker, ensure property rights, and to regulate the marketplace, as well as to promote income equality and social mobility, have had varied results.

12.E4 THE TOOLS OF ECONOMIC POLICY IN A GLOBAL ECONOMY: Globalization and increased economic interdependence affect the United States economy significantly. The tools that the policy makers have available to address these issues are fiscal policy, monetary policy, and trade policy.

12.E4b The president and Congress determine fiscal policy by establishing the level of spending and taxing in the annual budget. Some tax programs are designed to provide incentives to individuals and businesses that influence private sector spending, saving, and investment.

12.G5 PUBLIC POLICY: All levels of government—local, state, and federal—are involved in shaping public policy and responding to public policy issues, all of which influence our lives beyond what appears in the Constitution. Engaged citizens understand how to find, monitor, evaluate, and respond to information on public policy issues.

12.G5c Successful implementation of government policy often requires cooperation between many levels of government, as well as the cooperation of other public and private institutions. Conflicts between different levels of government sometimes emerge due to different goals, ideas, and resources regarding the creation and implementation of policy.

This tour supports the following Key Ideas and Conceptual Understandings of the New York State Framework for Social Studies:

UNIFYING SOCIAL STUDIES THEMES FOR K-12:

  • Time, Continuity, and Change
  • Geography, Humans, and the Environment
  • Power, Authority, and Governance
  • Civic Ideals and Practices
  • Creation, Expansion, and Interaction of Economic Systems
  • Science, Technology, and Innovation
  • Global Connections and Exchange

GRADE 8: HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES AND NEW YORK STATE II

8.6 WORLD WAR II: The aggression of the Axis powers threatened United States security and led to its entry into World War II. The nature and consequences of warfare during World War II transformed the United States and the global community. The damage from total warfare and atrocities such as the Holocaust led to a call for international efforts to protect human rights and prevent future wars.

8.6a Worldwide economic depression, militant nationalism, the rise of totalitarian rule, and the unsuccessful efforts of the League of Nations to preserve peace contributed to the outbreak of war in Europe and Asia.

8.6b From 1939 to 1941, the United States government tried to maintain neutrality while providing aid to Britain but was drawn into the war by the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. The United States fought a war on multiple fronts. At home, the economy was converted to war production, and essential resources were rationed to ensure adequate supplies for military use.

GRADE 10: GLOBAL HISTORY AND GEOGRAPHY II

1750–1914: AN AGE OF REVOLUTIONS, INDUSTRIALIZATION, AND EMPIRES 10.4 IMPERIALISM: Western European interactions with Africa and Asia shifted from limited regional contacts along the coast to greater influence and connections throughout these regions. Competing industrialized states sought to control and transport raw materials and create new markets across the world.

10.4a European industrialized states and Japan sought to play a dominant role in the world and to control natural resources for political, economic, and cultural reasons.

10.4c International conflicts developed as imperial powers competed for control. Claims over land often resulted in borders being shifted on political maps, often with little regard for traditional cultures and commerce (e.g., Berlin Conference).

1914–present:

10.5 UNRESOLVED GLOBAL CONFLICT (1914–1945): World War I and World War II led to geopolitical changes, human and environmental devastation, and attempts to bring stability and peace.

10.5a International competition, fueled by nationalism, imperialism, and militarism along with shifts in the balance of power and alliances, led to world wars.

10.5b Technological developments increased the extent of damage and casualties in both World War I and World War II.

10.6 UNRESOLVED GLOBAL CONFLICT (1945–1991: THE COLD WAR): The second half of the 20th century was shaped by the Cold War, a legacy of World War II. The United States and the Soviet Union emerged as global superpowers engaged in ideological, political, economic, and military competition.

10.6b The Cold War was a period of confrontations and attempts at peaceful coexistence.

GRADE 11: UNITED STATES HISTORY AND GOVERNMENT

11.8. WORLD WAR II (1935 – 1945): The participation of the United States in World War II was a transformative event for the nation and its role in the world.

11.8a As situations overseas deteriorated, President Roosevelt’s leadership helped to move the nation from a policy of neutrality to a pro-Allied position and, ultimately, direct involvement in the war.

11.8b United States entry into World War II had a significant impact on American society.

11.10 SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC CHANGE/DOMESTIC ISSUES (1945 – present): Racial, gender, and socioeconomic inequalities were addressed by individuals, groups, and organizations. Varying political philosophies prompted debates over the role of the federal government in regulating the economy and providing a social safety net.

11.10a After World War II, long-term demands for equality by African Americans led to the civil rights movement. The efforts of individuals, groups, and institutions helped to redefine African American civil rights, though numerous issues remain unresolved.

11.11 THE UNITED STATES IN A GLOBALIZING WORLD (1990 – present) The United States’ political and economic status in the world has faced external and internal challenges related to international conflicts, economic competition, and globalization. Throughout this time period, the nation has continued to debate and define its role in the world.

11.11c Globalization and advances in technology have affected the United States economy and society.

UNIFYING SOCIAL STUDIES THEMES FOR K-12 SUPPORTED BY TOUR:

  • Time, Continuity, and Change
  • Geography, Humans, and the Environment
  • Creation, Expansion, and Interaction of Economic Systems
  • Science, Technology, and Innovation
  • Global Connections and Exchange

GRADES 1-3: Geography, Humans, and the Environment:

1.5 The location and place of physical features and man-made structures can be described and interpreted by using symbols and geographic vocabulary.

1.6 People and communities depend on and modify their physical environment in order to meet basic needs.

2.5 Geography and natural resources shape where and how urban, suburban, and rural communities develop and how they sustain themselves.

3.1 Geographic regions have unifying characteristics and can be studied using a variety of tools.

3.3 Geographic factors often influence where people settle and form communities. People adapt to and modify their environment in different ways to meet their needs.

Time, Continuity, and Change:

1.8 Historical sources reveal information about how life in the past differs from the present.

2.6 Identifying continuities and changes over time can help understand historical developments.

2.7 Cause-and-effect relationships help us recount events and understand historical development.

Economic Systems

2.9 A community requires the interdependence of many people performing a variety of jobs and services to provide basic needs and wants.

3.9 Communities meet their needs and wants in a variety of ways, forming the basis for their economy.

3.10 Each community develops an economic system that addresses three questions: what will be produced, how will it be produced, and who will get what is produced?

GRADE 4: NEW YORK STATE AND LOCAL HISTORY AND GOVERNMENT

4.1 GEOGRAPHY OF NEW YORK STATE: New York State has a diverse geography. Various maps can be used to represent and examine the geography of New York State.

4.1a Physical and thematic maps can be used to explore New York State’s diverse geography.

4.6 WESTWARD MOVEMENT AND INDUSTRIALIZATION: New York State played an important role in the growth of the United States. During the 1800s, people traveled west looking for opportunities. Economic activities in New York State are varied and have changed over time, with improvements in transportation and technology.

4.6c Improved technology such, as the steam engine and the telegraph made transportation and communication faster and easier. Later developments in transportation and communication technology had an effect on communities, the State, and the world.

4.6f Between 1865 and 1915, rapid industrialization occurred in New York State. Over time, industries and manufacturing continued to grow.

5.7 ECONOMICS: The peoples of the Western Hemisphere have developed various ways to meet their needs and wants. Many of the countries of the Western Hemisphere trade with each other, as well as with other countries around the world.

5.7b Peoples of the Western Hemisphere have engaged in a variety of economic activities to meet their needs and wants.

5.7b Countries trade with other countries to meet economic needs and wants. They are interdependent.

Click here to fill out an inquiry formwhich will help us to better serve your needs. We are usually able to respond to your inquiry within 2 business days.


BROOKLYN ARMY TERMINAL TOURS

Turnstile Tours, Brooklyn Army Terminal

Step inside an engineering marvel that is today a center of innovation and business development in New York City. Built to supply American forces on the Western Front in World War I, this enormous Cass Gilbert-designed complex served as a supply base for the American military until the Vietnam War. Today, this thriving industrial park is home to over 100 companies in a wide array of industries, from precision manufacturers to biotech researchers, online retailers to chocolatiers.

On this 2-hour walking tour, we will explore how millions of tons of war supplies and personnel were shipped through this teeming transportation hub, hear the stories of soldiers, longshoremen, and merchant mariners who worked these piers, rail yards, and warehouses, and learn how these facilities are put to use today. Looking at the broader context, this tour will discuss what made the Port of New York the envy of the world in the mid-20th century, why it went into decline, and how Brooklyn’s working waterfront is being revitalized today. Along the way, we will enjoy sweeping views of the harbor, visit the 600,000-square-foot unrestored space of Building A, and step inside the Terminal’s architectural gem – the breathtaking atrium of Building B, where freight trains once rumbled through to be loaded from the innovative cantilevered balconies. Join us to explore the sights and stories of a century of work at the Brooklyn Army Terminal!

Brooklyn Army Terminal walking tours are available for 1 hour, 1.5 hours, or 2 hours.

The tour is designed to be 2 hours in length, so only the full 2-hour tour will include all the sites and themes listed in the description. We are happy to discuss any modification to the tour in order to accommodate your desired itinerary.

All rates below include a knowledgeable and engaging guide from Turnstile Tours and a map of the site.

All tours require a minimum of 12 participants or equivalent payment.

2-hour Tour:

  • Standard Rate: $22 per person
  • Non-profit & Educational Rate: $19.80 per person

1.5-hour Tour: 

  • Standard Rate: $19 per person
  • Non-profit & Educational Rate: $17.10 per person

1-hour Tour: 

  • Standard Rate: $16 per person
  • Non-profit & Educational Rate: $14.40 per person

Customized Itineraries and Tour Packages: Please contact us for customized requests and quotes.

All Brooklyn Army Terminal Tours are conducted on foot, though private groups that use coach buses may park on site, and some areas of the complex can be explored by by guided bus tour. Private buses must provide proof of commercial vehicle insurance and be accompanied by a tour guide in order to enter the Brooklyn Army Terminal.

Tours are offered seven days a week during daylight hours, subject to availability.

Private tours require a minimum of 12 participants, or equivalent payment. Single tours are limited to 30 participants, but we can accommodate up to 60 guests with multiple guides.

Brooklyn Navy Yard Tours can be customized and adapted to focus on specific themes or areas.

  • Role of New York Harbor in the World Wars
  • History of intermodal transportation and cargo handling
  • Historical and contemporary shipping operations in the Port of New York
  • Architectural history of concrete
  • Architect Cass Gilbert’s impact on industrial building design and construction
  • Adaptive reuse of industrial buildings
  • Industrial and creative sectors in New York City today
  • Public policy and urban planning

All tours listed support educators’ efforts to achieve standards outlined by the Common Core in English language arts and literacy, including grade-appropriate skills and understandings in alignment with Grades 6-12 Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects and with College and Career Readiness Standards for Speaking and Listening in both Comprehension and Collaboration and Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas.

While the Common Core has been adopted by over 40 states, social studies and science learning standards are still currently determined state by state; therefore, Turnstile Tours has used the New York State’s Social Studies Framework and New York State’s Science Learning Standards and Core Curriculum as a point of reference regarding content. Please click the tabs for specific information regarding content.

This tour supports the following Conceptual Understandings of the New York State Framework for Social Studies:

UNIFYING SOCIAL STUDIES THEMES FOR K-12:

  • Time, Continuity, and Change
  • Geography, Humans, and the Environment
  • Power, Authority, and Governance
  • Civic Ideals and Practices
  • Creation, Expansion, and Interaction of Economic Systems
  • Science, Technology, and Innovation
  • Global Connections and Exchange

GRADE 4: NEW YORK STATE AND LOCAL HISTORY AND GOVERNMENT

4.6 WESTWARD MOVEMENT AND INDUSTRIALIZATION: New York State played an important role in the growth of the United States. During the 1800s, people traveled west looking for opportunities. Economic activities in New York State are varied and have changed over time, with improvements in transportation and technology.

4.6c Improved technology such, as the steam engine and the telegraph made transportation and communication faster and easier. Later developments in transportation and communication technology had an effect on communities, the State, and the world.

4.6f Between 1865 and 1915, rapid industrialization occurred in New York State. Over time, industries and manufacturing continued to grow.

4.6g As manufacturing moved out of New York State, service industries and high-technology industries have grown.

GRADE 8: HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES AND NEW YORK STATE II

8.4 WORLD WAR I AND THE ROARING TWENTIES: Various diplomatic, economic, and ideological factors contributed to the United States decision to enter World War I. Involvement in the war significantly altered the lives of Americans. Postwar America was characterized by economic prosperity, technological innovations, and changes in the workplace.

8.4b International, economic, and military developments swayed opinion in favor of the United States siding with the Allies and entering World War I. Domestic responses to World War I limited civil liberties within the United States.

8.4c New military technologies changed military strategy in World War I and resulted in an unprecedented number of casualties.

8.6 WORLD WAR II: The aggression of the Axis powers threatened United States security and led to its entry into World War II. The nature and consequences of warfare during World War II transformed the United States and the global community. The damage from total warfare and atrocities such as the Holocaust led to a call for international efforts to protect human rights and prevent future wars.

8.6b From 1939 to 1941, the United States government tried to maintain neutrality while providing aid to Britain but was drawn into the war by the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. The United States fought a war on multiple fronts. At home, the economy was converted to war production, and essential resources were rationed to ensure adequate supplies for military use.

8.8 DEMOGRAPHIC CHANGE: After World War II, the population of the United States rose sharply as a result of both natural increases and immigration. Population movements have resulted in changes to the American landscape and shifting political power. An aging population is affecting the economy and straining public resources.

8.8a After World War II, the United States experienced various shifts in population and demographics that resulted in social, political, and economic consequences.

GRADE 11: UNITED STATES HISTORY AND GOVERNMENT 11.6 THE RISE OF AMERICAN POWER (1890 – 1920): Numerous factors contributed to the rise of the United States as a world power. Debates over the United States’ role in world affairs increased in response to overseas expansion and involvement in World War I. United States participation in the war had important effects on American society.

11.6b While the United States attempted to follow its traditional policy of neutrality at the beginning of World War I, the nation eventually became involved in the war. President Woodrow Wilson led the nation into war with the hope of reforming the international order through his Fourteen Points.

11.6c World War I had important social, political, and economic effects on American society.

11.11 THE UNITED STATES IN A GLOBALIZING WORLD (1990 – present) The United States’ political and economic status in the world has faced external and internal challenges related to international conflicts, economic competition, and globalization. Throughout this time period, the nation has continued to debate and define its role in the world.

11.11c Globalization and advances in technology have affected the United States economy and society.

GRADE 12: PARTICIPATION IN GOVERNMENT AND CIVICS

12.E3 THE IMPACT OF AMERICAN CAPITALISM IN A GLOBAL ECONOMY: There are various economic systems in the world. The United States operates within a mixed, free market economy that is characterized by competition and a limited role of government in economic affairs. Economic policy makers face considerable challenges within a capitalist system, including unemployment, inflation, poverty, and environmental consequences. Globalization increases the complexity of these challenges significantly, and has exerted strong and transformative effects on workers and entrepreneurs in the United States economy.

12.E3a As the United States has evolved from an agrarian to an industrial to an information economy, the workplace requires a more highly skilled and educated workforce.

12.E3b The government’s evolving role in protecting property rights, regulating working conditions, protecting the right to bargain collectively, and reducing discrimination in the workplace has attempted to balance the power between workers and employers. This role shifts in response to government’s need to stimulate the economy balanced against the need to curb abusive business practices.

12.E3c The freedom of the United States economy encourages entrepreneurialism. This is an important factor behind economic growth that can lead to intended consequences (e.g., growth, competition, innovation, improved standard of living, productivity, specialization, trade, outsourcing, class mobility, positive externalities) and unintended consequences (e.g., recession, depression, trade, unemployment, outsourcing, generational poverty, income inequality, the challenges of class mobility, negative externalities.).

12.E3d A degree of regulation, oversight, or government control is necessary in some markets to ensure free and fair competition and to limit unintended consequences of American capitalism. Government attempts to protect the worker, ensure property rights, and to regulate the marketplace, as well as to promote income equality and social mobility, have had varied results.

Click here to fill out an inquiry formwhich will help us to better serve your needs. We are usually able to respond to your inquiry within 2 business days, and you can always contact us for more information.


FOOD CART TOURS OF MANHATTAN

A woman wearing glasses in an apron and a young man next to her are both standing in front of a metal food cart on a busy street.Join us for this strolling lunch through Midtown or the Financial District to learn about the past and present of operating a street food business in New York City. While tasting the borough’s best street food at six different carts and trucks, you’ll taste cuisines ranging from Caribbean and Mexican to Bengali and Korean and learn about the vendors behind each of the recipes. But this is more than just a tasting tour – you will also learn the ins and outs of running one of these demanding small businesses, understand the complex regulations affecting the industry, learn about advocacy efforts led by the street vending community, and meet the vendors. This tour can be adapted to complement courses on a wide range of subjects, from immigration to business, regional and food studies, urban planning and public policy.

Food Cart walking tours are available for 1.5 hours or 2 hours.

The tour is designed to be 2 hours in length, so only the full 2-hour tour will include all the tastings and themes listed in the description. We are happy to discuss any modification to the tour in order to accommodate your desired itinerary.

All rates below include a knowledgeable and engaging guide from Turnstile Tours, 5-6 tastings from different carts and trucks, a bottle of water, and a map of NYC food carts and trucks.

All tours require a minimum of 6 participants or equivalent payment.

2-hour Tour (includes 5-6 tastings):

  • Standard Rate: $48 per person
  • Non-profit & Educational Rate: $43.20 per person

1.5-hour Tour (includes 4 tastings): 

  • Standard Rate: $40 per person
  • Non-profit & Educational Rate: $36 per person

Customized Itineraries and Tour Packages: Please contact us for customized requests and quotes.

All Food Cart Tours are conducted on foot.

Tours are offered on weekdays during lunch hours (roughly 11:30am-4pm), subject to availability. Depending on the season or day of the week, we may recommend specific times for the tour in different neighborhoods in order to maximize the number and variety of tastings, and to minimize delays during busy lunch service times.

Private tours require a minimum of 6 participants, or equivalent payment. Single tours are limited to 16 participants, but we can accommodate up to 80 guests with multiple guides.

We work with more than 40 street different street vendors, and our menu varies based on the neighborhood, day of the week, and which vendors are out on the street on a given day. Tastings on your tour may include falafel and lamb off the bone, halal chicken and rice with tamarind sauce, Korean short ribs, Indian kati rolls, Greek souvlaki, Vietnamese sandwiches, Belgian waffles, and Mexican quesadillas, all prepared in these amazing curbside kitchens.

We can also accommodate most dietary requirements, including vegetarian, vegan, and gluten-free diets. Please contact us for information on menu options, accommodations, and requests.

Food Cart Tours can be customized and adapted to focus on specific themes or areas, including:

  • Immigration patterns over time
  • City regulations affecting street vending
  • Street vendor advocacy organizations and campaigns
  • Regional cuisine and food studies
  • Case studies of entrepreneurship and business development
  • Policy debates over public space and street vending
  • Public policy and urban planning

All tours listed support educators’ efforts to achieve standards outlined by the Common Core in English language arts and literacy, including grade-appropriate skills and understandings in alignment with Grades 6-12 Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects and with College and Career Readiness Standards for Speaking and Listening in both Comprehension and Collaboration and Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas.

While the Common Core has been adopted by over 40 states, social studies and science learning standards are still currently determined state by state; therefore, Turnstile Tours has used the New York State’s Social Studies Framework and New York State’s Science Learning Standards and Core Curriculum as a point of reference regarding content. Please click the tabs for specific information regarding content.

This tour supports the following Conceptual Understandings of the New York State Framework for Social Studies:

UNIFYING SOCIAL STUDIES THEMES FOR K-12:

  • Individual Development and Cultural Identity
  • Development, Movement, and Interaction of Cultures
  • Time, Continuity, and Change
  • Geography, Humans, and the Environment
  • Development and Transformation of Social Structures
  • Power, Authority, and Governance
  • Civic Ideals and Practices
  • Global Connections and Exchange

GRADE 4: NEW YORK STATE AND LOCAL HISTORY AND GOVERNMENT 4.7 IMMIGRATION AND MIGRATION FROM THE EARLY 1800S TO THE PRESENT: Many people have immigrated and migrated to New York State contributing to its cultural growth and development.

4.7a Immigrants came to New York State for a variety of reasons. Many immigrants arriving in New York City were greeted by the sight of the Statue of Liberty and were processed through Ellis Island.

GRADE 8: HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES AND NEW YORK STATE II 8.8 DEMOGRAPHIC CHANGE: After World War II, the population of the United States rose sharply as a result of both natural increases and immigration. Population movements have resulted in changes to the American landscape and shifting political power. An aging population is affecting the economy and straining public resources.

8.8b The postwar United States experienced increasing immigration, debates over immigration policy, and an increase in cultural diversity.

GRADE 12: PARTICIPATION IN GOVERNMENT AND CIVICS 12.G4 POLITICAL AND CIVIC PARTICIPATION: There are numerous avenues for engagement in the political process, from exercising the power of the vote, to affiliating with political parties, to engaging in other forms of civic participation. Citizens leverage both electoral and non-electoral means to participate in the political process.

12.G4c In addition to voting, there are many ways in which citizens can participate in the electoral process. These include joining a political organization, donating money, and doing volunteer work on a political campaign.

12.G4e Citizens participate in civic life through volunteerism and advocacy, including efforts such as contacting elected officials, signing/organizing petitions, protesting, canvassing, and participating in/organizing boycotts.

12.G5 PUBLIC POLICY: All levels of government—local, state, and federal—are involved in shaping public policy and responding to public policy issues, all of which influence our lives beyond what appears in the Constitution. Engaged citizens understand how to find, monitor, evaluate, and respond to information on public policy issues.

12.G5c Successful implementation of government policy often requires cooperation between many levels of government, as well as the cooperation of other public and private institutions. Conflicts between different levels of government sometimes emerge due to different goals, ideas, and resources regarding the creation and implementation of policy.

12.G5d Active and engaged citizens must be effective media consumers in order to be able to find, monitor, and evaluate information on political issues. The media have different venues, which have particular strengths and serve distinct and shared purposes. Knowing how to critically evaluate a media source is fundamental to being an informed citizen.

12.E1 INDIVIDUAL RESPONSIBILITY AND THE ECONOMY: Individuals should set personal financial goals, recognize their income needs and debt obligations, and know how to utilize effective budgeting, borrowing, and investment strategies to maximize well-being.

12.E1a In making economic decisions in any role, individuals should consider the set of opportunities that they have, their resources (e.g., income and wealth), their preferences, and their ethics.

12. E2 INDIVIDUALS AND BUSINESSES IN THE PRODUCT AND FACTOR MARKETS: Free enterprise is a pillar of the United States economy and is based on the principle that individuals and businesses are free to make their own economic choices as they participate in these markets. Individuals buy the goods and services that they desire from businesses in the product markets, and they contribute to producing these goods and services by supplying the resources that they own to businesses in the factor markets.

12.E2a Given that the resources of individuals (and societies) are limited, decisions as to what goods and services will be produced and to whom to sell one’s resources are driven by numerous factors, including a desire to derive the maximum benefit from and thus the most efficient allocation of those resources.

12.E2b The choices of buyers and sellers in the marketplace determine supply and demand, market prices, allocation of scarce resources, and the goods and services that are produced. In a perfect world, consumers influence product availability and price through their purchasing Grades 9-12 Page 48 power in the product market. Product market supply and demand determine product availability and pricing.

12.E2c Businesses choose what to supply in the product market, based on product market prices, available technology, and prices of factors of production. The prices of those factors are determined based on supply and demand in the factor market. The supply and demand of each factor market is directly related to employment. Debates surround various ways to minimize unemployment (frictional, structural, cyclical).

12.E3 THE IMPACT OF AMERICAN CAPITALISM IN A GLOBAL ECONOMY: There are various economic systems in the world. The United States operates within a mixed, free market economy that is characterized by competition and a limited role of government in economic affairs. Economic policy makers face considerable challenges within a capitalist system, including unemployment, inflation, poverty, and environmental consequences. Globalization increases the complexity of these challenges significantly, and has exerted strong and transformative effects on workers and entrepreneurs in the United States economy.

12.E3b The government’s evolving role in protecting property rights, regulating working conditions, protecting the right to bargain collectively, and reducing discrimination in the workplace has attempted to balance the power between workers and employers. This role shifts in response to government’s need to stimulate the economy balanced against the need to curb abusive business practices.

12.E3c The freedom of the United States economy encourages entrepreneurialism. This is an important factor behind economic growth that can lead to intended consequences (e.g., growth, competition, innovation, improved standard of living, productivity, specialization, trade, outsourcing, class mobility, positive externalities) and unintended consequences (e.g., recession, depression, trade, unemployment, outsourcing, generational poverty, income inequality, the challenges of class mobility, negative externalities.).

12.E3d A degree of regulation, oversight, or government control is necessary in some markets to ensure free and fair competition and to limit unintended consequences of American capitalism. Government attempts to protect the worker, ensure property rights, and to regulate the marketplace, as well as to promote income equality and social mobility, have had varied results.

Click here to fill out an inquiry formwhich will help us to better serve your needs. We are usually able to respond to your inquiry within 2 business days, and you can always contact us for more information.


IMMIGRANT FOODWAYS PUBLIC MARKET TOUR

Angelo and Holly hi-res

From farms to pushcarts to public markets, this 2-hour walking and tasting tour explores historical aspects of New York’s food system and the influence of Caribbean and Latin American cultures and cuisines on the past and present of Williamsburg, Brooklyn. Once known for its pickles and kosher meat, today the eastern section of Williamsburg serves up herbal tea remedies from Mexicosounds of salsa, and traditional ingredients. Based on more than 20 oral history interviews with neighborhood residents and local business owners, and on original archival research, this tour explores the history of Brooklyn’s “Avenue of Puerto Rico” and takes an in-depth look at the Moore Street Market, built in 1941 to mark the end of the pushcart era and today a centerpiece of the Spanish-speaking community. The tour includes 6-8 generous tastings from market vendors and local eateries.

The Moore Street Market Immigrant Foodways walking tour is 1 hour or 2 hours.

We are happy to discuss any modification to the tour in order to accommodate your desired itinerary.

All rates below include a knowledgeable and engaging guide from Turnstile Tours, 6-8 tastings from different market vendors and local restaurants, a bottle of water, and a map of the neighborhood.

All tours require a minimum of 8 participants or equivalent payment.

2-hour Tour (includes 6-8 tastings):

  • Standard Rate: $48 per person
  • Non-profit & Educational Rate: $43.20 per person

1-hour Tour (includes 3 tastings):

  • Standard Rate: $30 per person
  • Non-profit & Educational Rate: $27 per person

Customized Itineraries and Tour Packages: Please contact us for customized requests and quotes.

All Immigrant Foodways Tours are conducted on foot.

Tours are offered on weekdays during the market’s operating hours (10am-6pm), subject to availability. Depending on the season or day of the week, we may recommend specific times for the tour in order to maximize the number and variety of tastings.

Private tours require a minimum of 6 participants, or equivalent payment. Single tours are limited to 16 participants, but we can accommodate up to 48 guests with multiple guides.

Tastings on the tour may include (but are subject to change) morcilla sausagegreen bananas and onionsroasted pork and chickensancocho stewbatidos (Latin American hand-made beverages), plantainssorullos (corn fritters), tembleque, and tamarind juice.

With advance notice, most dietary preferences or restrictions can be accommodated. Vegetarians can be easily accommodated, and while we strive to accommodate all dietary needs, visitors with a vegan diet may have a more limited menu, though we offer the same quantity of food. Please contact us for information on menu options, accommodations, and requests.

Immigrant Foodways Tours can be customized and adapted to focus on specific themes or areas, including:

  • Cultural and culinary traditions from Puerto Rico, Dominican Republic, and Mexico
  • Historical patterns of settlement of Jewish and Latin American communities in NYC
  • Latino studies
  • Food studies
  • History of public markets in NYC & US
  • Urban food systems
  • Culinary traditions and food networks in immigrant communities in NYC
  • Immigrant entrepreneurship in NYC
  • Local economic development
  • Public policy and urban planning

All tours listed support educators’ efforts to achieve standards outlined by the Common Core in English language arts and literacy, including grade-appropriate skills and understandings in alignment with Grades 6-12 Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects and with College and Career Readiness Standards for Speaking and Listening in both Comprehension and Collaboration and Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas.

While the Common Core has been adopted by over 40 states, social studies and science learning standards are still currently determined state by state; therefore, Turnstile Tours has used the New York State’s Social Studies Framework and New York State’s Science Learning Standards and Core Curriculum as a point of reference regarding content. Please click the tabs for specific information regarding content.

This tour supports the following Unifying Social Studies Themes and Conceptual Understandings of the New York State Framework for Social Studies:

UNIFYING SOCIAL STUDIES THEMES FOR K-12:

  • Individual Development and Cultural Identity
  • Development, Movement, and Interaction of Cultures
  • Time, Continuity, and Change
  • Creation, Expansion, and Interaction of Economic Systems
  • Global Connections and Exchange

THIS TOUR SUPPORTS THE FOLLOWING CONCEPTUAL UNDERSTANDINGS FOR NEW YORK STATE:

GRADE 4: NEW YORK STATE AND LOCAL HISTORY AND GOVERNMENT

4.7 IMMIGRATION AND MIGRATION FROM THE EARLY 1800S TO THE PRESENT: Many people have immigrated and migrated to New York State contributing to its cultural growth and development.

4.7a Immigrants came to New York State for a variety of reasons. Many immigrants arriving in New York City were greeted by the sight of the Statue of Liberty and were processed through Ellis Island.

GRADE 5: THE WESTERN HEMISPHERE

5.3 EUROPEAN EXPLORATION AND ITS EFFECTS: Various European powers explored and eventually colonized the Western Hemisphere. This had a profound effect on Native Americans and led to the transatlantic slave trade.

5.3c The transatlantic trade of goods, movement of people, and spread of ideas and diseases resulted in cultural diffusion

5.5 COMPARATIVE CULTURES: The countries of the Western Hemisphere are diverse and the cultures of these countries are rich and varied. Due to their proximity to each other, the countries of the Western Hemisphere share some of the same concerns and issues.

5.5a The countries of the Western Hemisphere have varied characteristics and contributions that distinguish them from other countries.

5.5b. Countries in the Western Hemisphere face a variety of concerns and issues specific to the region.

5.7 ECONOMICS: The peoples of the Western Hemisphere have developed various ways to meet their needs and wants. Many of the countries of the Western Hemisphere trade with each other, as well as with other countries around the world.

5.7a Different types of economic systems have developed across time and place within the Western Hemisphere. These economic systems, including traditional, market, and command, address the three economic questions: what will be produced, how it will be produced, and who will get what is produced?

5.7b Peoples of the Western Hemisphere have engaged in a variety of economic activities to meet their needs and wants.

5.7c Countries trade with other countries to meet economic needs and wants. They are interdependent.

GRADE 8: HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES AND NEW YORK STATE II

8.3 EXPANSION AND IMPERIALISM: Beginning in the second half of the 19th century, economic, political, and cultural factors contributed to a push for westward expansion and more aggressive United States foreign policy.

8.3b The Spanish-American War contributed to the rise of the United States as an imperial power.

8.8 DEMOGRAPHIC CHANGE: After World War II, the population of the United States rose sharply as a result of both natural increases and immigration. Population movements have resulted in changes to the American landscape and shifting political power. An aging population is affecting the economy and straining public resources.

8.8b The postwar United States experienced increasing immigration, debates over immigration policy, and an increase in cultural diversity.

8.9 DOMESTIC POLITICS AND REFORM: The civil rights movement and the Great Society were attempts by people and the government to address major social, legal, economic, and environmental problems. Subsequent economic recession called for a new economic program.

8.9b The civil rights movement prompted renewed efforts for equality by women and other groups.

GRADE 9: GLOBAL HISTORY AND GEOGRAPHY I  Global Interactions, ca. 1400 – 1750

9.10 INTERACTIONS AND DISRUPTIONS: Efforts to reach the Indies resulted in the encounter between the people of Western Europe, Africa, and the Americas. This encounter led to a devastating impact on populations in the Americas, the rise of the transatlantic slave trade, and the reorientation of trade networks.

9.10b Transatlantic exploration led to the Encounter, colonization of the Americas, and the Columbian exchange.

9.10d European colonization in the Americas and trade interactions with Africa led to instability, decline, and near destruction of once-stable political and cultural systems.

GRADE 12: PARTICIPATION IN GOVERNMENT AND CIVICS

12. E2 INDIVIDUALS AND BUSINESSES IN THE PRODUCT AND FACTOR MARKETS: Free enterprise is a pillar of the United States economy and is based on the principle that individuals and businesses are free to make their own economic choices as they participate in these markets. Individuals buy the goods and services that they desire from businesses in the product markets, and they contribute to producing these goods and services by supplying the resources that they own to businesses in the factor markets.

12.E2c Businesses choose what to supply in the product market, based on product market prices, available technology, and prices of factors of production. The prices of those factors are determined based on supply and demand in the factor market. The supply and demand of each factor market is directly related to employment. Debates surround various ways to minimize unemployment (frictional, structural, cyclical).

12.E3 THE IMPACT OF AMERICAN CAPITALISM IN A GLOBAL ECONOMY: There are various economic systems in the world. The United States operates within a mixed, free market economy that is characterized by competition and a limited role of government in economic affairs. Economic policy makers face considerable challenges within a capitalist system, including unemployment, inflation, poverty, and environmental consequences. Globalization increases the complexity of these challenges significantly, and has exerted strong and transformative effects on workers and entrepreneurs in the United States economy.

12.E3c The freedom of the United States economy encourages entrepreneurialism. This is an important factor behind economic growth that can lead to intended consequences (e.g., growth, competition, innovation, improved standard of living, productivity, specialization, trade, outsourcing, class mobility, positive externalities) and unintended consequences (e.g., recession, depression, trade, unemployment, outsourcing, generational poverty, income inequality, the challenges of class mobility, negative externalities.).

12.E3d A degree of regulation, oversight, or government control is necessary in some markets to ensure free and fair competition and to limit unintended consequences of American capitalism. Government attempts to protect the worker, ensure property rights, and to regulate the marketplace, as well as to promote income equality and social mobility, have had varied results.

12.E3e The degree to which economic inequality reflects social, political, or economic injustices versus individual choices is hotly debated. The role that the government should play in decreasing this gap, including the variety of government programs designed to combat poverty, is debated as well.

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