Curbed: Exploring Brooklyn’s last remaining dry docks

Curbed New York, May 3, 2018

by Nathan Kensinger

It’s a strange feeling to be standing in the mud 40 feet below the East River without getting wet. Even stranger is having a 119-foot-tall ship above your head, its 12,000 tons balanced out on a few concrete blocks around you. So it goes every day in the dry docks of the GMD Shipyard, Brooklyn’s last ship repair facility. 

The carpentry shop, surrounded by wooden shims, which used to help support ships resting on the dry dock blocks. During World War II, the Brooklyn Navy Yard was “the world’s busiest shipyard,” according to Turnstile Tours, the yard’s official tour company, and 70,000 workers were employed here “building battleships and aircraft carriers, repairing over 5,000 ships.”

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Brooklyn Navy Yard: Archtober Tours

Presented by the Center for Architecture, Archtober is an annual festival of lectures, tours, exhibitions, and films that celebrate all things architecture in New York City. These special tours of the Brooklyn Navy Yard will focus on the Yard’s unique built environment, including the Architecture & Infrastructure TourUrban Ecology Tour, and a special series of Inside Industry Tours featuring technology hardware prototyping space New Lab.

Select dates in October | Bus, Bicycle, Walking | >> More information<<

Chicago Tribune: Borough with a view: Brooklyn beckons with new hotels, other perks

Chicago Tribune, November 6, 2017

by Elaine Glusac

The Brooklyn Navy Yard, an expansive, 300-acre patch of waterfront established in 1801 and the birthplace of the USS Maine, now serves as an incubator for startups. We visited the center of green entrepreneurship, hosting everything from a film studio to an eco-manufacturing center and artist studios, on Turnstile Tours’ two-hour trip around the docks ($30) that drew both history buffs and hipsters.

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The Bridge: The Brooklyn Tour Guides Who Know All the Secrets

Tower of Brooklyn Bridge graphic

The Bridge, July 12, 2017

by Emily Nonko

As Brooklyn’s tourism industry heats up, double-decker buses have crossed the river in herds, whirling visitors around Grand Army Plaza and other dramatic sights. But to paraphrase the song from Hamilton, what’d they miss? Lots, according to Brooklyn-based Turnstile Tours, which has made a name for itself with a completely different approach: depth. On a Turnstile Tour of the cavernous Brooklyn Army Terminal, for example, you’ll find out that the massive base was once used as a storage warehouse for alcohol seized during Prohibition. Millions of gallons of booze were dumped into the harbor!

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French Morning: Vignoble-rooftop, distillerie, entrepôts: visitez le Brooklyn Navy Yard

French morning logo

French Morning, July 5, 2017

by Nadège Fougeras

Pour cette expérience, vous allez devoir être organisés. Car vous devrez vous inscrire à une visite.

Le Brooklyn Navy Yard, vous le voyez sur toutes les cartes, mais y êtes-vous déjà allés ? C’est cette friche industrielle immense au nord du pont de Manhattan, dans laquelle ont été construits les plus grands bateaux de la marine américaine. Un lieu hautement chargé d’histoire.

Il y a encore six mois, on pouvait s’y balader en loucedé, sans trop se faire prendre. Aujourd’hui, on dirait Fort Knox. Tout cet espace est en effet en train d’être complètement réhabilité et transformé pour accueillir des entreprises, des artistes, un musée… C’est incroyable et impressionnant. Ici, le but, c’est de créer des emplois, plus que de faire de l’argent. Les loyers sont faibles, et devraient le rester. (Bon, ça, on verra. On est à NY, ne l’oublions pas;-)

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Traveller Australia: Food Truckin’ in the Big Apple

A T in a turquoise circle on white background. The Traveller Australia logo

Traveller Australia, June 30, 2017

by Rob McFarland

“What do you think was the first food sold on the streets of New York?” asks Doug, our enthusiastic guide from Turnstile Tours. Our group stands in stony silence with furrowed brows. Everyone else is from an 18-35s Contiki tour and some of them haven’t been to bed yet after last night’s revelry. It’s a little early for quizzes.

The unexpected answer is oysters. New York once had vast oyster beds and in the early 1900s they were sold by street vendors as a low-cost snack.

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Brooklyn Daily Eagle: Tour of Navy Yard, old & new, ties together three 19th-century Brooklyn icons

Brooklyn Daily Eagle, May 23, 2017

by Paula Katinas

Andrew Sichenze, a lawyer from Bay Ridge, has many fond memories of the first time he visited the Brooklyn Navy Yard as a fresh-faced 12-year-old boy back in 1944. It was during World War II and young Sichenze had come to the Navy Yard to witness the christening of a majestic new ship.

“I had an uncle who worked in the Brooklyn Navy Yard. Seeing the ship christened was an amazing experience for a kid. It was so exciting,” Sichenze told the Brooklyn Eagle.

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Harper’s Bazaar Spain: Esto es lo que se come ahora en las calles de Nueva York

Harper's Bazaar Spain Logo

Harper’s Bazaar Spain, May 4, 2017

by Sergio Cabrera

Las calles del Midtown de Nueva York se encuentran siempre en constante ebullición. En el que bien podríamos considerar epicentro del planeta, nunca se duerme. Y mucho menos ahora, cuando el lugar más turístico por excelencia se reivindica como uno de los rincones con más novedades que ofrecer en la Gran Manzana.

Imprescindible por sus iconos, tales como el Empire State Building, la Grand Central Terminal, el Rockefeller Center, las principales tiendas de la Quinta Avenida o Broadway y Times Square, el Midtown de Nueva York se ha convertido también en todo un encuentro de tendencias gastronómicas. Concretamente, las que giran entorno a la comida callejera. Puestos ambulantes y pequeños mostradores en tiendas de todos los tamaños compiten por convertirse en el negocio que ofrezca el bocado rápido más de moda. En torno al Bryant Park, hay docenas para elegir, a cuál más interesante.

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The Lo-Down: Essex Street Market Debuts Historical Mural

The Lo-Down, January 30, 2017

by Ed Litvak

If you visited the Essex Street Market this past weekend, you probably noticed this new historical mural celebrating the legacy of the 77-year-old public facility.

The 20-foot display presents a timeline from 1900 through the opening of the market by Mayor Fiorello La Guardia in 1940, up to the present day. It was a collaboration among the Lower East Side Partnership, the Essex Street Market Vendor Association and Turnstile Tours, which provided research for the project. It was made possible through a grant from Avenue NYC, a program of the NYC Department of Small Business Services. The mural was installed in partnership with the Economic Development Corp., which operates the market.

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