Atlas Obscura: Ruins and Revitalization at the Brooklyn Navy Yard

Atlas Obscura, January 23, 2015

by Shereen Malek

Earlier this month, the New York Obscura Society embarked on a behind-the-scenes tour of the Brooklyn Navy Yard to explore the rich history of the vast 300-acre property. Led by Andrew Gustafson of Turnstile Tours, the tour chronicled the Yard’s evolution, which originally served as a shipyard from 1776 to 1965 and is now an industrial park with thriving manufacturing and commercial activity where over 200 businesses employ more than 5,000 people.

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New York Times: Next Phase of Renovation to Begin at a Vast Military Remnant in Brooklyn

New York Times, January 21, 2015

Building Blocks – David W. Dunlap

“Drive slow — 8 M.P.H.,” the signs say along the South Brooklyn waterfront, between 59th and 63rd Streets.

Nothing exceptional about them, except that they are posted on the sixth floor.

That’s how big the Brooklyn Army Terminal is. Before the 1,000-foot-long floors of its two main buildings were divided in recent decades, the best way to get around them was in a Jeep.

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“Find Something Just For You”: TaraFawn Marek Offers Advice for Photographing Brooklyn Navy Yard

Photo by TaraFawn Marek @thetfawn

Having just crowed winners of our 2014 Brooklyn Navy Yard Photography Contest, we’re ready to dive into the 2015 season – the first tour is thus Sunday, January 25 at 11am, departing from the Brooklyn Navy Yard Center at BLDG 92.

• Get tickets for the Brooklyn Navy Yard Seasonal Photography Tour, Sunday, January 25, 11am •

As many of you know, each season we accept photo submissions from our tourgoers, and then we have a judge select their three favorites to be finalists in the year-end contest. In 2013, all four of our judges were professional photographers and visual artists who have studio space at the Yard. In 2014, we invited participants in the BLDG 92 Visiting Artist Program. Now that our Seasonal Photography Tours are in their third year, we thought that we would invite some of the past tour participants to judge.>> Continue reading

See the Winners of the 2014 Brooklyn Navy Yard Photo Contest

The Brooklyn Navy Yard attracts photographers. This 300-acre secure industrial park offers a varied mix of natural and industrial landscapes, historic and innovative buildings, aging elements infused with new energy. While the Yard remains a vibrant and growing industrial park, and it is a popular site for professional film productions and movie shoots, for the past two years, we have offered our Seasonal Photography Tours (the next one is January 25) to provide amateur photographers the opportunity to explore the Yard with their cameras. We also invite those tour participants to submit their photos to our annual contest, and the results have been remarkable.>> Continue reading

BLDG 92 & Brooklyn Historical Society: Brooklyn Navy Yard STEM and Sustainability Research

Research and content development for STEM-based K-12 programs

In 2014, Turnstile was commissioned by the Brooklyn Historical Society and the Brooklyn Navy Yard Center at BLDG 92 to create a research document about STEM and sustainability-related topics, both historical and contemporary, at the Brooklyn Navy Yard. This research project was designed to be the content foundation for the development of STEM-based K-12 programs at the Yard.>> Continue reading

Brooklyn Navy Yard Development Corporation: Ambassador Training

Visitor services trainings for security and front-line staff

This interactive training session for the security staff at the Brooklyn Navy Yard focused on visitor interaction, customer service, and anticipating and adapting to the needs of visitors, including people with disabilities. Led by Cindy VandenBosch, this session explored scenarios and proposed strategies for anticipating and addressing the needs of the wide range of visitors that come to the Brooklyn Navy Yard Center at BLDG 92 in efforts to provide a more welcoming experience for all, including first-time visitors, area residents seeking employment services, and people with visible and invisible disabilities. With training tools and examples drawn from real-life scenarios at BLDG 92, topics covered included tools and tips for positive and proactive visitor engagement, a basic review of effective communication strategies and barrier-free aspects of the the American with Disabilities Act, and interactive exercises to generate group-based discussion on effective practices specific to BLDG 92.

“We Need Your Skills”: Pearl Harbor and the Brooklyn Navy Yard

The Brooklyn Navy Yard is 5,000 miles from Pearl Harbor, and though the reverberations of the events there on December 7, 1941 were felt across the globe, they hit especially hard on this small stretch of the Brooklyn waterfront.

Already 140 years old at the time, the Brooklyn Navy Yard had established itself as one of the most venerable shipbuilding and ship repair facilities in the Navy, and the Yard would be pushed to the limit during World War II, building, repairing, and servicing more than 5,000 vessels in just four years. Not only would ships be brought from across the world to be patched up and pushed back into the service at the Yard, but the Yard’s skilled craftsmen would be dispatched to other shipyards to help keep the fleet in fighting order.>> Continue reading

News 4 New York: Pearl Harbor Day

News 4 New York, December 5, 2014

Andrew Gustafson, vice president of Turnstile Tours, speaks with Roseanne Colletti regarding Brooklyn Navy Yard’s exhibit, “The ‘Can-Do’ Yard: WWII at the Brooklyn Navy Yard.”

“We’re especially proud of the fact that the Brooklyn Navy Yard built the USS Arizona, which was sunk on December 7, 1941, with the loss of 1,177 sailors aboard. We also built the USS Missouri, which is where the peace treaty that ended World War II was signed, so we have the bookends of the war that were built here at the Navy Yard.”

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Mayor LaGuardia and the War on Sidewalk Christmas Tree Sellers

It’s that time of year again – we’ve had our first snow in New York City, Christmas music is playing in every shop and store, and Christmas tree stands line the sidewalks.

While most Americans buy their Christmas trees from places like hardware stores, garden centers, churches, or Wal-Mart, New Yorkers rely on a somewhat unique economy of sellers that occupy public sidewalks all over the city for one month a year. So, how did we arrive at this arrangement, and why does it persist when so much of our city’s sidewalk economy has been stamped out?>> Continue reading