Atlas Obscura: Ruins and Revitalization at the Brooklyn Navy Yard

Atlas Obscura, January 23, 2015

by Shereen Malek

Earlier this month, the New York Obscura Society embarked on a behind-the-scenes tour of the Brooklyn Navy Yard to explore the rich history of the vast 300-acre property. Led by Andrew Gustafson of Turnstile Tours, the tour chronicled the Yard’s evolution, which originally served as a shipyard from 1776 to 1965 and is now an industrial park with thriving manufacturing and commercial activity where over 200 businesses employ more than 5,000 people.

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New York Times: Next Phase of Renovation to Begin at a Vast Military Remnant in Brooklyn

New York Times, January 21, 2015

Building Blocks – David W. Dunlap

“Drive slow — 8 M.P.H.,” the signs say along the South Brooklyn waterfront, between 59th and 63rd Streets.

Nothing exceptional about them, except that they are posted on the sixth floor.

That’s how big the Brooklyn Army Terminal is. Before the 1,000-foot-long floors of its two main buildings were divided in recent decades, the best way to get around them was in a Jeep.

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News 4 New York: Pearl Harbor Day

News 4 New York, December 5, 2014

Andrew Gustafson, vice president of Turnstile Tours, speaks with Roseanne Colletti regarding Brooklyn Navy Yard’s exhibit, “The ‘Can-Do’ Yard: WWII at the Brooklyn Navy Yard.”

“We’re especially proud of the fact that the Brooklyn Navy Yard built the USS Arizona, which was sunk on December 7, 1941, with the loss of 1,177 sailors aboard. We also built the USS Missouri, which is where the peace treaty that ended World War II was signed, so we have the bookends of the war that were built here at the Navy Yard.”

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Curbed New York: At 95, The Repurposed Army Terminal Still Impresses

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Curbed New York, November 18, 2014

by Evan Bindelglass

Four million square feet of indoor space. Thirty-two elevators. Ninety-five years old. Sunset Park’s Brooklyn Army Terminal is massive, unusual, and wholly unexpected. Originally built in 1919 to transfer copious quantities of manpower and supplies from land to sea and back again, these days parts of the complex have been converted into office space. But its architecture—with arches everywhere and one awesome atrium, designed by Cass Gilbert of Woolworth Building fame—remains a marvel.

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DNAinfo: How Young New York City Businesses Mix Philanthropy and Profit

DNAinfo New York, September 4, 2014

by Serena Solomon

Turnstile’s philanthropic efforts may appear to be an extra burden to add to the usual hardships of starting a small business — about 50 percent of businesses survive only five years, according to the Small Business Administration — but VandenBosch said “we factored it in from the beginning” and “that money is not ours.”

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Thompson Reuters: Benefit Corporations: Organizing for Multiple Stakeholders

Thompson Reuters Sustainability, May 30, 2014

by Shari Helaine Littan

In the last couple of years, the phrase “sustainability” seems to have touched every aspect of business. With the adoption of “benefit corporation” statutes, even traditional corporate law is evolving to respond to corporate responsibility expectations of an expanding group of stakeholders, such as customers, employees, and taxpayers.

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DNAinfo: WWII Boat Cruise Shows Off City’s Harbor History for Fleet Week

DNAinfo New York, May 21, 2014

by Matthew Katz

A historical boat cruise will let New Yorkers get up a close look at the city’s maritime past during the World War II.

For both Fleet Week and Memorial Day, Classic Harbor Lines and Turnstile Tours will let passengers sail from Chelsea Piers past the Brooklyn Navy Yard and Brooklyn Army Terminal, and learn the history of the harbor during WWII.

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New York Daily News: Brooklyn Army Terminal opening up for tours of the 95-year-old Sunset Park military depot

New York Daily News, September 14, 2013

by Matt Chaban

What do Elvis, Prohibition-era bootleggers and dinosaur bones all have in common? They’ve all spent their fair share of time at the Brooklyn Army Terminal in Sunset Park.

And now you can, too.

For the first time, the city is offering regular tours of the 95-year-old former military depot on the waterfront in Sunset Park.

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New York Times: A Return to Duty for the Brooklyn Navy Yard Hospital

New York Times, September 19, 2013

Streetscapes – Christopher Gray

The Brooklyn Navy Yard is known for its muscular collection of industrial architecture. Here, the battleship Missouri and other warships were built and repaired until the yard closed five decades ago. The regular weekend tours of the Navy Yard cover that and more, but at the end comes an unexpected treat: the magnificent, slightly sagging Naval Hospital, a ghostly marble temple built in 1838 and empty for two decades. A new plan may sweep away the cobwebs.

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