Expanding the Brooklyn Botanic Garden’s Welcome

Logo of the Brooklyn Botanic Garden with a plant with red, green, and blue and the word of the organization spelled out

Training and Assessment for Institutional Capacity Building for Accessibility

Turnstile Studio is currently serving as a primary consultant on Expanding Brooklyn Botanic Garden’s Welcome, a three-year project that aims to set a new institution-wide baseline for inclusively welcoming and serving visitors with disabilities to the Brooklyn Botanic Garden.  In Year One (2019), Turnstile Studio is conducting a baseline assessment across all visitor-facing departments through focus groups, surveys, and workshops; supporting the formation of a best practices working group and an inter-departmental task force; designing and facilitating accessibility training workshops and materials tailored to each department for all front-line staff (security, visitor services, education, horticulture, etc.); and providing analysis and recommendations for short- and long-term capacity-building efforts.

The Great War and NYC: Prospect Park

A statue of a soldier who stands clutching his gun and looking off into the distance as an angel begins to wrap her wing and arm around him

April 6, 2017 marked the 100th anniversary of the US entry into the First World War. America’s involvement was comparatively brief, yet the war had massive impacts on American society. This year, we will be posting a series of articles about the ways in which the war affected the sites where we work in New York City.


War has played an integral part in the history of Prospect Park. In August 1776, the future site of the Park was a battleground, as American troops tried to stop the British advance in the epochal Battle of Brooklyn. Originally conceived in 1861, the Civil War intervened; this turned out to be a blessing, as the pause gave the Park’s commissioners reason to reconsider the original design – with Flatbush Avenue coursing through the middle of the proposed park – and instead hire the visionary team of Calvert Vaux and Frederick Law Olmsted. 50 years into its life, World War I would arrive to alter the Park’s landscape yet again.>> Continue reading