Brooklyn Army Terminal Tours

Step inside an engineering marvel that is today a center of manufacturing and innovation on Brooklyn’s Sunset Park waterfront. Built to supply American forces in World War I, this enormous Cass Gilbert-designed complex served as a supply base for the American military for nearly 50 years, employing more than 20,000 people during World War II. Today, this thriving industrial park is home to over 100 companies in a wide array of industries, from precision manufacturers to biotech researchers, online retailers to chocolatiers.

On this 2-hour walking tour, we will explore how millions of tons of war supplies and personnel were shipped through this teeming transportation hub, hear the stories of soldiers, longshoremen, and merchant mariners who worked these piers, rail yards, and warehouses, and learn how these facilities are put to use today. Looking at the broader context, this tour will discuss what made the Port of New York the envy of the world in the mid-20th century, why it went into decline, and how Brooklyn’s working waterfront is being revitalized today. Along the way, we will enjoy sweeping views of the harbor, closely examine the architecture and infrastructure, and step inside the Terminal’s architectural gem – the breathtaking atrium of Building B, where freight trains once rumbled through to be loaded from the innovative cantilevered balconies. Join us to explore the sights and stories of a century of work at the Brooklyn Army Terminal!

Tour Info & Highlights

  • Step inside the breathtaking atrium, where military cargo trains were once unloaded
  • Enjoy sweeping views of New York Harbor as we discuss the past and present of the working waterfront
  • Hear stories of soldiers, sailors, and longshoremen who passed through the Army Terminal
  • Learn about the 100+ companies that call this city-owned industrial park home today
icon-calendar  SAT 11am
icon-clock-o  2 hours
  Walking tour
icon-map-marker  Sunset Park, Brooklyn 
 

These tours are offered in partnership with the New York City Economic Development Corporation.

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