Brooklyn Navy Yard Summer Photography Contest Judge: Painter Jeff Britton

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On our Brooklyn Navy Yard Photography Tours, we’re always encouraging people to look for the unexpected. Even on streets we’ve walked down a thousand times, there may be something new, or something very old you never noticed before.

Walking down the halls of the enormous Building 3, constructed in 1917 and one of the Yard’s largest buildings, I recently found something very unexpected. I walked into Triple J Bedding, a distributor of linens to hotels and hospitals across the country; stacks of sheets, blankets, and towels were stacked floor to ceiling with just narrow passages between them. After wending my way through this cavern, I found a little oasis at the back – the studio of artist Jeff Britton. (more…)


The Bridge: The Brooklyn Tour Guides Who Know All the Secrets

Filed to: Benefit CorporationsBrooklyn Army TerminalBrooklyn Navy YardPressProspect ParkPublic Markets

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The Bridge, July 12, 2017

by Emily Nonko

As Brooklyn’s tourism industry heats up, double-decker buses have crossed the river in herds, whirling visitors around Grand Army Plaza and other dramatic sights. But to paraphrase the song from Hamilton, what’d they miss? Lots, according to Brooklyn-based Turnstile Tours, which has made a name for itself with a completely different approach: depth. On a Turnstile Tour of the cavernous Brooklyn Army Terminal, for example, you’ll find out that the massive base was once used as a storage warehouse for alcohol seized during Prohibition. Millions of gallons of booze were dumped into the harbor!

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French Morning: Vignoble-rooftop, distillerie, entrepôts: visitez le Brooklyn Navy Yard

Filed to: Brooklyn Navy YardPress

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French Morning, July 5, 2017

by Nadège Fougeras

Pour cette expérience, vous allez devoir être organisés. Car vous devrez vous inscrire à une visite.

Le Brooklyn Navy Yard, vous le voyez sur toutes les cartes, mais y êtes-vous déjà allés ? C’est cette friche industrielle immense au nord du pont de Manhattan, dans laquelle ont été construits les plus grands bateaux de la marine américaine. Un lieu hautement chargé d’histoire.

Il y a encore six mois, on pouvait s’y balader en loucedé, sans trop se faire prendre. Aujourd’hui, on dirait Fort Knox. Tout cet espace est en effet en train d’être complètement réhabilité et transformé pour accueillir des entreprises, des artistes, un musée… C’est incroyable et impressionnant. Ici, le but, c’est de créer des emplois, plus que de faire de l’argent. Les loyers sont faibles, et devraient le rester. (Bon, ça, on verra. On est à NY, ne l’oublions pas;-)

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Guide to Fleet Week New York 2017 Ships

Filed to: Brooklyn Navy YardEventsWaterfront

Flight deck of USS Bataan, Fleet Week 2016

This year during Fleet Week New York, we will be visited by more than a dozen ships and units from the US Navy, Coast Guard, Marine Corps, Military Sealift Command, and Royal Canadian Navy that will be berthed at locations in Manhattan, Brooklyn, Staten Island, and the Bronx. Here’s a brief guide to some of the units that will be in town, and be sure to check out the full schedule of events on the official Fleet Week NYC website.

Manhattan Pier 88

  • USS Kearsarge open for visitors May 25, 26, 27, and 29, 8am–5pm

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Brooklyn Daily Eagle: Tour of Navy Yard, old & new, ties together three 19th-century Brooklyn icons

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Brooklyn Daily Eagle, May 23, 2017

by Paula Katinas

Andrew Sichenze, a lawyer from Bay Ridge, has many fond memories of the first time he visited the Brooklyn Navy Yard as a fresh-faced 12-year-old boy back in 1944. It was during World War II and young Sichenze had come to the Navy Yard to witness the christening of a majestic new ship.

“I had an uncle who worked in the Brooklyn Navy Yard. Seeing the ship christened was an amazing experience for a kid. It was so exciting,” Sichenze told the Brooklyn Eagle.

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The Many Names of the Brooklyn Navy Yard

Filed to: Brooklyn Navy Yard

The names of the Brooklyn Navy Yard are etched in the landscape.

Some of the subjects we frequently have to address on our tours of the Brooklyn Navy Yard are: where is it? and what is the official name?

So let’s start with the first question. The Brooklyn Navy Yard is located on the banks of the Wallabout Bay, a bend in the East River located opposite Manhattan’s Corlears Hook. The Yard has grown considerably since it was established in 1801 with the purchase of 23 acres of land on the bay’s western shore. Today, it encompasses 300 acres that encircle the bay from west to east, bounded by Little Street and Navy Street to the west, Flushing Avenue to the south, and Williamsburg Street, Kent Avenue, and Division Avenue to the east.  (more…)


Immigrants Who Made the Brooklyn Navy Yard Great: Baldev Duggal

Filed to: Brooklyn Navy Yard

Baldev Duggal in the Duggal Greenhouse. Photo courtesy of Duggal Visual Solutions

This post is part of our eight-part series profiling immigrants to the United States who made significant contributions to the Brooklyn Navy Yard from the eighteenth century to the present day.


Baldev Duggal (1937–2016)

So far in this series, all of the individuals we have profiled worked at the Brooklyn Navy Yard when it was still a naval shipyard. But Baldev Duggal was an individual who played an instrumental role in the long process of transforming the Yard from a dilapidated naval facility into a thriving industrial business center. (more…)


Immigrants Who Made the Brooklyn Navy Yard Great: Stanislaw Kozikowski

Filed to: Brooklyn Navy Yard

Kozikowski photo

This post is part of our eight-part series profiling immigrants to the United States who made significant contributions to the Brooklyn Navy Yard from the eighteenth century to the present day.


Stanislaw Kozikowski (1895–1967)

Stan Kozikowski came to fame as a young man in the First World War, but spent much of his life as an unheralded machinist in the Brooklyn Navy Yard. He was born in Poland – then part of the Russian Empire – in 1895 (according to his naturalization record; other records cite 1894 and 1896) and emigrated to the United States in 1912; five years later, about age 21 and not yet a US citizen, he was drafted into the US Army. There he joined the famed 77th “Statue of Liberty” Division, 308th Infantry Regiment, which is where he would demonstrate his remarkable bravery as a member of the “Lost Battalion.” (more…)


Immigrants Who Made the Brooklyn Navy Yard Great: Frederick Lois Riefkohl

Filed to: Brooklyn Navy Yard

Frederick Lois Riefkohl as a midshipman at the US Naval Academy, 1911

This post is part of our eight-part series profiling immigrants to the United States who made significant contributions to the Brooklyn Navy Yard from the eighteenth century to the present day.


Frederick Lois Riefkohl (1889–1969)

The histories of Puerto Rico and of the US military are deeply intertwined, and much of that history runs through the career of Frederick Lois Riefkohl, the first Puerto Rican to graduate from the US Naval Academy, to win the Navy Cross, and to achieve the rank of rear admiral. Normally we would not consider someone from Puerto Rico an immigrant – they are US citizens – but Reifkohl lived in a complicated time. (more…)