Vote in the 2017 Brooklyn Navy Yard Photo Contest

Filed to: Brooklyn Navy YardPhotography

Over the course of five years of leading our photography tours of the Brooklyn Navy Yard, we have received well over 500 photographs from 118 photographers submitted to our photo contest. For year five, we need your help to select the best photo of the Yard of 2017. All of these photos were taken across four two-hour explorations we led in partnership with the Brooklyn Navy Yard Center at BLDG 92. This year, we received 121 submissions from 18 different visitors, and our judges volunteered their time to select the 10 you see below. (more…)


The Brooklyn Navy Yard and the US Occupation of Haiti, 1915–1934

Filed to: Brooklyn Navy YardWorld War I

As we reflect on the deeper meaning and troubling implication of the US president describing certain foreign countries as “shitholes,” it has also opened an opportunity to think critically about how and why these places became impoverished. Often, European and American imperial intervention – or outright exploitation – played a significant role. While we celebrate the Brooklyn Navy Yard as a center of innovation, labor, and service, we must also recognize its role in projecting American power across the globe, sometimes for less-than-noble ends.

Take Haiti, the world’s first free black republic, founded as the result of a slave rebellion against French colonial rule. Following the revolution, France and the Great Powers attempted to strangle this young nation in the crib, placing trade embargoes and saddling it with astronomical debt. The United State has a long and complicated history with the second-oldest republic in the Western Hemisphere, but the height of US involvement was when the American military occupied Haiti from 1915 to 1934. Many of the actions of this military operation originated 1,300 miles away in Brooklyn. (more…)


Escape: New York City Bus Tours: See a Different Side of the Big Apple

Filed to: Brooklyn Navy YardPress

Escape, January 16, 2018

by Rob McFarland

Turnstile has a diverse range of tours but one of its most interesting is an exploration of the Brooklyn Navy Yard. For 165 years, this vast 120ha site south of Williamsburg was a busy naval shipyard, responsible for the construction of battleships such as the USS Arizona plus the repair of thousands more. Today, the complex has been transformed into a city-owned industrial park and is home to more than 300 manufacturing and creative businesses.

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New York Times: After the Launching (and Scrapping) of Navy Ships, a New Mission

Filed to: ArchitectureBrooklyn Navy YardPressWaterfront

New York Times, December 26, 2017

by C.J. Hughes

Three other federally owned naval yards — in Kittery, Me.; Portsmouth, Va.; and Washington — have more traditional maritime uses.

“One of the great things about the redevelopment of the Navy yards is that there’s been so much preservation of the historic character,” said Andrew Gustafson, who has led tours of the Brooklyn Navy Yard since 2010. “The history’s a selling point. It makes the place unique and attractive.”

A visit helps convey the vastness of Kearny’s shipbuilding operation, which at its peak during World War II churned out a finished ship every six days courtesy of 35,000 employees, according to Hugo Neu.

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From Fulton to Constellation: The Worst Accidents in the History of the Brooklyn Navy Yard

Filed to: Brooklyn Navy Yard

Today marks the 57th anniversary of perhaps the darkest day in the history of the Brooklyn Navy Yard. To commemorate the fire on board the USS Constellation, we are going to look back at some of the most notable and deadliest accidents in the history of the Yard.

Shipbuilding is a dangerous business (even today), and fatal accidents were frequent throughout industry in the nineteenth century. The scale, pace, and nature of the work in the Navy Yard made it particularly risky, as workers and sailors fell victim to hazards like falling from great heights, being struck by heavy loads, violent machinery, drowning, fires, and exploding munitions and equipment. Workplace safety began to improve around the time of World War I, and more concerted campaigns began during World War II, when safety was urged as an imperative of national security. (more…)


Brooklyn Navy Yard Fall Photo Contest

Filed to: Brooklyn Navy YardPhotography

For our penultimate Brooklyn Navy Yard Seasonal Photography Tour of 2017, we asked another Yard-based artist to make selections for the year-end finalists. Nick Golebiewski is a visual artist who makes large-scale gouache paintings – a type of opaque watercolor – of New York cityscapes. His “Nick’s Lunchbox Service” is daily drawing series in which he draws the landscape in front on him, and is definitely worth checking out on his Instagram feed. The series is in its fourth year and has been featured as a Twitter Moment, in collaborations online with the Jewish Museum, the Museum at Eldridge Street, and Dyckman Farmhouse Museum, and through the “Walk & Draw” tours he’s led with the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation. (more…)


Hopkins Views from the Hill: Hopkins’ Network at Work

Filed to: Brooklyn Navy YardPressStreet Vending

Hopkins Views from the Hill, Fall 2017

by Judy Sirota Rosenthal and Leo Sorrel

In July 2017, Andrew Gustafson hosted a student from his high school alma mater, New Haven’s Hopkins School, as part of the school’s Job Shadow Program. Senior Andrew Roberge joined us checking in with our street vendor partners in Midtown, working in our office in the Brooklyn Navy Yard, and attending a professional development training at Green-Wood Cemetery.

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Chicago Tribune: Borough with a view: Brooklyn beckons with new hotels, other perks

Filed to: Brooklyn Navy YardPress

Chicago Tribune, November 6, 2017

by Elaine Glusac

The Brooklyn Navy Yard, an expansive, 300-acre patch of waterfront established in 1801 and the birthplace of the USS Maine, now serves as an incubator for startups. We visited the center of green entrepreneurship, hosting everything from a film studio to an eco-manufacturing center and artist studios, on Turnstile Tours’ two-hour trip around the docks ($30) that drew both history buffs and hipsters.

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Archtober Podcast: Brooklyn Grange Farm at the Brooklyn Navy Yard

Filed to: ArchitectureBrooklyn Navy YardPressWorld War I

Throughout AIA NY’s Archtober – New York Architecture Month – each day has a “Building of the Day,” which is highlighted with tours and other programming. This year, three of the 29 featured sites are located in the Brooklyn Navy Yard, including New Lab, the Naval Cemetery Landscape, and on October 3, the Brooklyn Grange Rooftop Farm. As part of the celebration, our own Andrew Gustafson sat down with Grange COO Gwen Schantz to talk about the farm and the history of the building it sits on, the massive Building 3.

In this 5-minute conversation, they discussed the construction of Building 3 during the height of World War I, past and current uses of the building, and how and why the Grange built their 1.5-acre farm on this 11-story structure. The podcast is featured on Culture Now’s Museum Without Walls project. (more…)