Curbed New York: Revamped Brooklyn Navy Yard Begins Its Slow Unfurling

Filed to: Brooklyn Navy YardPhotographyPress

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Curbed New York, May 12, 2016

Camera Obscura – Nathan Kensinger

For many years, the Brooklyn Navy Yard has been a forbidding presence along the East River waterfront, hidden from the surrounding neighborhood behind walls and fences, with warning signs along its perimeter blaring out antiquated threats: This Installation Patrolled by Military Working Dogs! It Is Unlawful To Enter Without Permission Of The Commanding Officer! Security checkpoints block every entrance to the yard, while inside, patrol cars circle constantly and a security booth is set up at the MTA bus stop to check the identification of anyone disembarking. This month, however, several new projects are cracking open these barriers and granting the public access to parts of the Navy Yard that have been unseen for decades.

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Wall Street Journal: Brooklyn ‘Annex’ to Bring Back Manufacturing

Filed to: Brooklyn Army TerminalPress

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Wall Street Journal, January 13, 2016

by Corinne Ramey

During World War II, the Administration Building at the Brooklyn Army Terminal directed a hive of activity. Supply depots and barracks down the East Coast were all controlled by staff in the Sunset Park neighborhood.

“You had literally an army of people managing all the soldiers passing through every supply depot and every camp within a couple hundred miles of New York City,” said Andrew Gustafson, vice president of Turnstile Tours.

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Gothamist: Deep Inside the Brooklyn Army Terminal

Filed to: Brooklyn Army TerminalPhotographyPress

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Gothamist, November 29, 2015

by Laren Evans / Photos by Tod Seelie

The four-million-square-foot Brooklyn Army Terminal has a long and interesting history as a military supply base, but these days, it’s still getting a handle on its new life as a commercial hub.

The federal government sold the terminal to New York City in 1981, and a few years later, a wholesale renovation began. It’s come a long way since then—notable tenants now include such diverse neighbors as the NYPD’s intelligence division, the chocolatier Jacques Torres, the New York City Bioscience initiative center and the Museum of Natural History.

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Gothamist: Behind The Scenes At The Brooklyn Navy Yard

Filed to: Brooklyn Navy YardPress

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Gothamist, May 6, 2015

by Emma Whitford / Photos by Tod Seelie

For the past seven years, the staff at Turnstile Tours has been offering two-hour bus and bicycle tours of the typically off-limits Brooklyn Navy Yard, a sprawling 300-acre property that includes a whole lot more than woodworking studios and the Brooklyn Grange. For starters, there’s an 1856 eagle-topped monument tucked away there, commemorating the Battle of the Barrier Forts, an assault led by the U.S. Navy against Qing Dynasty citadels on China’s Pearl River, during the Second Opium War. Who could forget!

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The Brooklyn Reader: Take a Tour of the Navy Yard

Filed to: Brooklyn Navy YardPhotographyPress

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The Brooklyn Reader, January 27, 2015

by C. Zawadi Morris

The Brooklyn Reader took a photo tour of the facility with Turnstile Tours, which offers a variety of tours at the Navy Yard, to learn more about this re-developing historical landmark, located right in our backyard.

First stop: Building 92 (BLDG 92). BLDG 92 is, for most who do not work in the complex, the first destination for all entering the yard. The center was built to be meticulously sustainable and environmentally friendly, as a re-introduction to the community to celebrate the Navy Yard’s past, present and future. BLDG 92 is an exhibition, visitors and employment center that is operated as a program of the Brooklyn Navy Yard Development Corporation (BNYDC), the non-profit corporation that manages the Brooklyn Navy Yard.

BNYDC’s mission is to promote local economic development and job creation, develop underutilized areas and oversee modernization of the Yard’s infrastructure and assets while maintaining its historical integrity.

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Atlas Obscura: Ruins and Revitalization at the Brooklyn Navy Yard

Filed to: Brooklyn Navy YardPhotographyPress

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Atlas Obscura, January 23, 2015

by Shereen Malek

Earlier this month, the New York Obscura Society embarked on a behind-the-scenes tour of the Brooklyn Navy Yard to explore the rich history of the vast 300-acre property. Led by Andrew Gustafson of Turnstile Tours, the tour chronicled the Yard’s evolution, which originally served as a shipyard from 1776 to 1965 and is now an industrial park with thriving manufacturing and commercial activity where over 200 businesses employ more than 5,000 people.

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New York Times: Next Phase of Renovation to Begin at a Vast Military Remnant in Brooklyn

Filed to: Brooklyn Army TerminalPress

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New York Times, January 21, 2015

Building Blocks – David W. Dunlap

“Drive slow — 8 M.P.H.,” the signs say along the South Brooklyn waterfront, between 59th and 63rd Streets.

Nothing exceptional about them, except that they are posted on the sixth floor.

That’s how big the Brooklyn Army Terminal is. Before the 1,000-foot-long floors of its two main buildings were divided in recent decades, the best way to get around them was in a Jeep.

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News 4 New York: Pearl Harbor Day

Filed to: Brooklyn Navy YardPressWorld War II

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News 4 New York, December 5, 2014

Andrew Gustafson, vice president of Turnstile Tours, speaks with Roseanne Colletti regarding Brooklyn Navy Yard’s exhibit, “The ‘Can-Do’ Yard: WWII at the Brooklyn Navy Yard.”

“We’re especially proud of the fact that the Brooklyn Navy Yard built the USS Arizona, which was sunk on December 7, 1941, with the loss of 1,177 sailors aboard. We also built the USS Missouri, which is where the peace treaty that ended World War II was signed, so we have the bookends of the war that were built here at the Navy Yard.”

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Curbed New York: At 95, The Repurposed Army Terminal Still Impresses

Filed to: Brooklyn Army TerminalPress

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Curbed New York, November 18, 2014

by Evan Bindelglass

Four million square feet of indoor space. Thirty-two elevators. Ninety-five years old. Sunset Park’s Brooklyn Army Terminal is massive, unusual, and wholly unexpected. Originally built in 1919 to transfer copious quantities of manpower and supplies from land to sea and back again, these days parts of the complex have been converted into office space. But its architecture—with arches everywhere and one awesome atrium, designed by Cass Gilbert of Woolworth Building fame—remains a marvel.

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