Traveller Australia: New York food cart tour: food truckin’ in the Big Apple

Filed to: PressStreet Vending

Traveller.com.au, June 30, 2017

by Rob McFarland

“What do you think was the first food sold on the streets of New York?” asks Doug, our enthusiastic guide from Turnstile Tours. Our group stands in stony silence with furrowed brows. Everyone else is from an 18-35s Contiki tour and some of them haven’t been to bed yet after last night’s revelry. It’s a little early for quizzes.

The unexpected answer is oysters. New York once had vast oyster beds and in the early 1900s they were sold by street vendors as a low-cost snack.

>> Read More


Brooklyn Daily Eagle: Tour of Navy Yard, old & new, ties together three 19th-century Brooklyn icons

Filed to: Brooklyn Navy YardPress

Brooklyn Daily Eagle, May 23, 2017

by Paula Katinas

Andrew Sichenze, a lawyer from Bay Ridge, has many fond memories of the first time he visited the Brooklyn Navy Yard as a fresh-faced 12-year-old boy back in 1944. It was during World War II and young Sichenze had come to the Navy Yard to witness the christening of a majestic new ship.

“I had an uncle who worked in the Brooklyn Navy Yard. Seeing the ship christened was an amazing experience for a kid. It was so exciting,” Sichenze told the Brooklyn Eagle.

>> Read More


Harper’s Bazaar Spain: Esto es lo que se come ahora en las calles de Nueva York

Filed to: PressStreet Vending

Harper’s Bazaar Spain, May 4, 2017

by Sergio Cabrera

Las calles del Midtown de Nueva York se encuentran siempre en constante ebullición. En el que bien podríamos considerar epicentro del planeta, nunca se duerme. Y mucho menos ahora, cuando el lugar más turístico por excelencia se reivindica como uno de los rincones con más novedades que ofrecer en la Gran Manzana.

Imprescindible por sus iconos, tales como el Empire State Building, la Grand Central Terminal, el Rockefeller Center, las principales tiendas de la Quinta Avenida o Broadway y Times Square, el Midtown de Nueva York se ha convertido también en todo un encuentro de tendencias gastronómicas. Concretamente, las que giran entorno a la comida callejera. Puestos ambulantes y pequeños mostradores en tiendas de todos los tamaños compiten por convertirse en el negocio que ofrezca el bocado rápido más de moda. En torno al Bryant Park, hay docenas para elegir, a cuál más interesante.

>> Read More


The Lo-Down: Essex Street Market Debuts Historical Mural

Filed to: PressPublic Markets

The Lo-Down, January 30, 2017

by Ed Litvak

If you visited the Essex Street Market this past weekend, you probably noticed this new historical mural celebrating the legacy of the 77-year-old public facility.

The 20-foot display presents a timeline from 1900 through the opening of the market by Mayor Fiorello La Guardia in 1940, up to the present day. It was a collaboration among the Lower East Side Partnership, the Essex Street Market Vendor Association and Turnstile Tours, which provided research for the project. It was made possible through a grant from Avenue NYC, a program of the NYC Department of Small Business Services. The mural was installed in partnership with the Economic Development Corp., which operates the market.

>> Read More


Curbed New York: Revamped Brooklyn Navy Yard Begins Its Slow Unfurling

Filed to: Brooklyn Navy YardPhotographyPress

Curbed New York, May 12, 2016

Camera Obscura – Nathan Kensinger

For many years, the Brooklyn Navy Yard has been a forbidding presence along the East River waterfront, hidden from the surrounding neighborhood behind walls and fences, with warning signs along its perimeter blaring out antiquated threats: This Installation Patrolled by Military Working Dogs! It Is Unlawful To Enter Without Permission Of The Commanding Officer! Security checkpoints block every entrance to the yard, while inside, patrol cars circle constantly and a security booth is set up at the MTA bus stop to check the identification of anyone disembarking. This month, however, several new projects are cracking open these barriers and granting the public access to parts of the Navy Yard that have been unseen for decades.

>> Read More


Wall Street Journal: Brooklyn ‘Annex’ to Bring Back Manufacturing

Filed to: Brooklyn Army TerminalPress

Wall Street Journal, January 13, 2016

by Corinne Ramey

During World War II, the Administration Building at the Brooklyn Army Terminal directed a hive of activity. Supply depots and barracks down the East Coast were all controlled by staff in the Sunset Park neighborhood.

“You had literally an army of people managing all the soldiers passing through every supply depot and every camp within a couple hundred miles of New York City,” said Andrew Gustafson, vice president of Turnstile Tours.

>> Read More


Gothamist: Deep Inside the Brooklyn Army Terminal

Filed to: Brooklyn Army TerminalPhotographyPress

Gothamist, November 29, 2015

by Laren Evans / Photos by Tod Seelie

The four-million-square-foot Brooklyn Army Terminal has a long and interesting history as a military supply base, but these days, it’s still getting a handle on its new life as a commercial hub.

The federal government sold the terminal to New York City in 1981, and a few years later, a wholesale renovation began. It’s come a long way since then—notable tenants now include such diverse neighbors as the NYPD’s intelligence division, the chocolatier Jacques Torres, the New York City Bioscience initiative center and the Museum of Natural History.

>> Read More


Gothamist: Behind The Scenes At The Brooklyn Navy Yard

Filed to: Brooklyn Navy YardPress

Gothamist, May 6, 2015

by Emma Whitford / Photos by Tod Seelie

For the past seven years, the staff at Turnstile Tours has been offering two-hour bus and bicycle tours of the typically off-limits Brooklyn Navy Yard, a sprawling 300-acre property that includes a whole lot more than woodworking studios and the Brooklyn Grange. For starters, there’s an 1856 eagle-topped monument tucked away there, commemorating the Battle of the Barrier Forts, an assault led by the U.S. Navy against Qing Dynasty citadels on China’s Pearl River, during the Second Opium War. Who could forget!

>> Read More


The Brooklyn Reader: Take a Tour of the Navy Yard

Filed to: Brooklyn Navy YardPhotographyPress

The Brooklyn Reader, January 27, 2015

by C. Zawadi Morris

The Brooklyn Reader took a photo tour of the facility with Turnstile Tours, which offers a variety of tours at the Navy Yard, to learn more about this re-developing historical landmark, located right in our backyard.

First stop: Building 92 (BLDG 92). BLDG 92 is, for most who do not work in the complex, the first destination for all entering the yard. The center was built to be meticulously sustainable and environmentally friendly, as a re-introduction to the community to celebrate the Navy Yard’s past, present and future. BLDG 92 is an exhibition, visitors and employment center that is operated as a program of the Brooklyn Navy Yard Development Corporation (BNYDC), the non-profit corporation that manages the Brooklyn Navy Yard.

BNYDC’s mission is to promote local economic development and job creation, develop underutilized areas and oversee modernization of the Yard’s infrastructure and assets while maintaining its historical integrity.

>> Read More


Atlas Obscura: Ruins and Revitalization at the Brooklyn Navy Yard

Filed to: Brooklyn Navy YardPhotographyPress

Atlas Obscura, January 23, 2015

by Shereen Malek

Earlier this month, the New York Obscura Society embarked on a behind-the-scenes tour of the Brooklyn Navy Yard to explore the rich history of the vast 300-acre property. Led by Andrew Gustafson of Turnstile Tours, the tour chronicled the Yard’s evolution, which originally served as a shipyard from 1776 to 1965 and is now an industrial park with thriving manufacturing and commercial activity where over 200 businesses employ more than 5,000 people.

>> Read More