Metro: The 8 essential things to do during Fleet Week in New York

A white globe on a green background. The Metro New York logo

Metro New York, May 21, 2018

by Eva Kis

Tour Military History: For Memorial Day, classic Harbor Line and Turnstile Tours have created a special Military History Tour ($68) about the city’s past from the Revolutionary War through World War II. Sail past New York’s harbor forts, see the Brooklyn Army Terminal, wave to the Statue of Liberty and go all the way down to Staten Island’s Homeport during a 2.5-hour tour aboard a 1920s-inspired yacht. 

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Curbed: Exploring Brooklyn’s last remaining dry docks

Curbed New York, May 3, 2018

by Nathan Kensinger

It’s a strange feeling to be standing in the mud 40 feet below the East River without getting wet. Even stranger is having a 119-foot-tall ship above your head, its 12,000 tons balanced out on a few concrete blocks around you. So it goes every day in the dry docks of the GMD Shipyard, Brooklyn’s last ship repair facility. 

The carpentry shop, surrounded by wooden shims, which used to help support ships resting on the dry dock blocks. During World War II, the Brooklyn Navy Yard was “the world’s busiest shipyard,” according to Turnstile Tours, the yard’s official tour company, and 70,000 workers were employed here “building battleships and aircraft carriers, repairing over 5,000 ships.”

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Escape: New York City Bus Tours: See a Different Side of the Big Apple

Escape

Escape, January 16, 2018

by Rob McFarland

Turnstile has a diverse range of tours but one of its most interesting is an exploration of the Brooklyn Navy Yard. For 165 years, this vast 120ha site south of Williamsburg was a busy naval shipyard, responsible for the construction of battleships such as the USS Arizona plus the repair of thousands more. Today, the complex has been transformed into a city-owned industrial park and is home to more than 300 manufacturing and creative businesses.

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New York Times: After the Launching (and Scrapping) of Navy Ships, a New Mission

New York Times, December 26, 2017

by C.J. Hughes

Three other federally owned naval yards — in Kittery, Me.; Portsmouth, Va.; and Washington — have more traditional maritime uses.

“One of the great things about the redevelopment of the Navy yards is that there’s been so much preservation of the historic character,” said Andrew Gustafson, who has led tours of the Brooklyn Navy Yard since 2010. “The history’s a selling point. It makes the place unique and attractive.”

A visit helps convey the vastness of Kearny’s shipbuilding operation, which at its peak during World War II churned out a finished ship every six days courtesy of 35,000 employees, according to Hugo Neu.

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PIX11 News: History of Food Carts and Vendors in NYC is Celebrated

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PIX 11 News, aired November 29, 2017

by Greg Mocker

Greg Mocker of PIX 11 News not only attended our panel discussion at the Museum at Eldridge Street, which included panelists from the Street Vendor Project, 800BuyCart, Cinnamon Snail, Veronica’s Kitchen, and moderated by our own Cindy VandenBosch, he also made sure that he tried some street food from Midtown’s Royal Halal, one of our favorites.

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Hopkins Views from the Hill: Hopkins’ Network at Work

Hopkins Views from the Hill, Fall 2017

by Judy Sirota Rosenthal and Leo Sorrel

In July 2017, Andrew Gustafson hosted a student from his high school alma mater, New Haven’s Hopkins School, as part of the school’s Job Shadow Program. Senior Andrew Roberge joined us checking in with our street vendor partners in Midtown, working in our office in the Brooklyn Navy Yard, and attending a professional development training at Green-Wood Cemetery.

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Chicago Tribune: Borough with a view: Brooklyn beckons with new hotels, other perks

Chicago Tribune, November 6, 2017

by Elaine Glusac

The Brooklyn Navy Yard, an expansive, 300-acre patch of waterfront established in 1801 and the birthplace of the USS Maine, now serves as an incubator for startups. We visited the center of green entrepreneurship, hosting everything from a film studio to an eco-manufacturing center and artist studios, on Turnstile Tours’ two-hour trip around the docks ($30) that drew both history buffs and hipsters.

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Archtober Podcast: Brooklyn Grange Farm at the Brooklyn Navy Yard

Throughout AIA NY’s Archtober – New York Architecture Month – each day has a “Building of the Day,” which is highlighted with tours and other programming. This year, three of the 29 featured sites are located in the Brooklyn Navy Yard, including New Lab, the Naval Cemetery Landscape, and on October 3, the Brooklyn Grange Rooftop Farm. As part of the celebration, our own Andrew Gustafson sat down with Grange COO Gwen Schantz to talk about the farm and the history of the building it sits on, the massive Building 3.

In this 5-minute conversation, they discussed the construction of Building 3 during the height of World War I, past and current uses of the building, and how and why the Grange built their 1.5-acre farm on this 11-story structure. The podcast is featured on Culture Now’s Museum Without Walls project.>> Continue reading